Author: Adnan Raja

What is Digital Digital Illiteracy?

Adnan Raja August 12, 2013 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

I know I have become a bit lazy these days in regards to my computing skills.   It’s a housekeeping attitude, if you don’t do it regularly, things start to get murky on your laptop. So what is the problem exactly?  Well here’s where Marc Scott highlights what seems to be a real growing problem… Digital illiteracy:

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The History of Cloud Computing

Adnan Raja August 4, 2013 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Believe it or not, the concept of cloud computing technologies has actually been around since the mid-1990s; back then, it had a more complex name: “on-demand infrastructure.” How has this technology evolved over the past two decades to become the immensely powerful phenomenon it is today?

From basic web server architecture to simple database management and from less-than-technical email applications to minimal disk space, the original web hosting services we born around the 1990s and exploded in popularity during the dot-com era (1995-2001). Some of the earliest shared hosting companies included ValueWeb, Interland and HostGator.

The first shared hosting solutions offered multi-tenancy capability, automated provisioning, a monthly billing cycle and an easy-to-use interface for maintaining resources. However, these solutions did not inherently provide infrastructure on demand, resource-size flexibility or scalability. It was a simplistic offering but helped to create the foundation for the Cloud hosting industry.

Around 1998, virtual private servers (VPS) arrived on the scene. By offering some more flexibility and administrative root access, VPS solutions offered a significant step up from shared hosting capabilities of the past.

Early VPS hosting companies provided servers that offered occasional infrastructure on demand, slight resource-size flexibility, multi-tenancy, automated provisioning and the convenience of monthly, quarterly or annual billing cycles.

For businesses that needed stricter security measures and more stable resources, dedicated hosting solutions that were developed soon after the release of VPS did the trick. These servers offered more power along will complete administrative access and control of server resources.

These dedicated servers did not provide multi-tenancy, network flexibility or scalability. However, providers supplied both managed and unmanaged dedicated hosting options, giving customers the ability to choose between relying on professionals to maintain the architecture, or employing an IT department to handle it.

The launch of Amazon Web Services in 2006 really began to change the industry. Between 2007 and 2010, several managed hosting companies developed and released a more scalable and more virtualized Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offering. Today, this is referred to as grid/utility computing.

IaaS providers offer computers—whether physical or virtual—and other resources to customers. The earliest providers of utility computing included Layered Technologies, NaviSite and Savvis. These hosts offered infrastructure on demand, partial resource-size flexibility, multi-tenancy, occasional automated provisioning, partial scalability, a monthly, quarterly or annual billing rate and a slightly easy-to-use interface.

As discussed before, the development of Amazon’s Web Services really kicked things off in the way of cloud computing. In fact, the AWS system transitioned from a grid/utility computing model and moved toward what we can only call “Public Cloud Computing 1.0.”

Between 2008 and 2009, developers and startup hosting companies alike had the ability to compute and store data like never before, and, with time, they were able to eventually scale this data and infrastructure resources at a whim. Along with Amazon, Rackspace Hosting was the main component of this transition.

Cloud servers infrastructure on demand, partial resource size flexibility, multi-tenancy, automated provisioning, slight scalability, hourly billing (the first of its kind!) and a fairly easy-to-use interface.

The introduction of hourly billing in cloud computing 1.0 was a big deal, for both providers and customers. This model gave customers the ability to pay what they really should—not some previously agreed-upon subscription price. By narrowing the billing down to the hour, customers saved money, and this made them happy.

Today, we are witnessing a progression into the Cloud Computing 2.0 era. The next generation of cloud computing will need to be easier, more flexible and billed based upon a true utility model (like that of electricity and water) in order to provide customers with the services and products they need.

Current cloud 2.0 companies, such as Atlantic.Net, offer infrastructure on demand, fully customizable resource-size flexibility, multi-tenancy, applications on demand, network flexibility, automated provisioning, complete scalability, billing down to the minute or second and a simple drag-and-drop interface control for ease of use. Sure, cloud computing 2.0 companies are offering services that speak truer to the definition of the cloud than ever before, but we’re still not quite there.

In the future, the Cloud and the technologies serving as the backbone of the Cloud will need to cross the metaphorical river of development to attract a wider audience beyond that of organizations and enterprises. Small successful startups are driving innovation today, and cloud computing will need to become more saleable, more flexible and more based upon a true utility model in order to drive this innovation even further.

Since 1994, Atlantic.Net has stayed above the competition to fuel innovation and move technologies to new environments never previously imaginable. As the technology continues to evolve from 2.0 into 3.0 and beyond, you can rest assured knowing that you are relying on the most up-to-date architecture and standards in the business.

To learn more about the Atlantic.Net business model, see our full line of one-click cloud applications and to see how transitioning to a cloud hosting service can help transform your business, contact us today.

We also offer HIPAA compliant hosting solutions – contact us for a consultation.



Are You Guilty of Shadow IT Practices?

Adnan Raja July 22, 2013 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

 It’s a new term, but an old concept: the phrase “shadow IT” refers to employees using computing methods not previously approved by the company in order to work more efficiently. Sometimes used interchangeably with the term “stealth IT,” IT departments are often kept in the dark about these methods, only finding out once it’s too late. But if employees are getting their work done, what can be so bad about it?

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Ecommerce Web Design

Adnan Raja July 15, 2013 by under Dedicated Hosting 0 Comments

Placing promotions in the sweet spot is different for every web page but, on the home page, then it’s usually the corner that all of the eyes will be moving towards. Normally, and this is the case for western culture, Americans are used to going to start in the top left corner when they start reading something.   Atlantic.Net shares top advice business advice to our Community as well as offering award-winning Cloud hosting solutions.

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10 Things Your Hosting Company May Not Tell You

Adnan Raja July 15, 2013 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

When you’re searching the market for a cloud solution, make sure you ask vendors for the whole story. As we all probably already know, not all cloud servers are created equal. It is highly recommended that you look beyond marketing claims and search the fine print and ask the right questions. Here are ten critical points you should bring up when talking to potential providers, especially because they probably won’t bring it up first.

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Common Mistakes Made During Cloud hosting Migration

Adnan Raja July 1, 2013 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

  • Cheaper Rather than Better
  • Throwing Out Traditional Equipment
  • Failing to Make Applications Cloud-Ready
  • Not Taking Big Data Into Account
  • Assuming All Clouds Are the Same

Cheaper Rather than Better

In the above video, Atlantic.Net CEO Marty Puranik notes that companies have been more focused on cheaper solutions in recent years, especially given the impact of the Great Recession; but excessive focus on price is a mistake. All of the great advancement that humanity has achieved arose from a focus on better rather than cheaper, he stresses.

Having tunnel vision for anything but the price is just one of the mistakes made by organizations when they migrate to the cloud. Tech reporter Jeff Bertolucci talked about typical problems that arise in his InformationWeek article “10 Cloud Migration Mistakes to Avoid.”

Four of the errors that he highlights are throwing out traditional equipment, failing to make applications cloud-ready, not taking big data into account, and assuming all clouds are the same.

Throwing Out Traditional Equipment

Many organizations don’t know exactly what to do with their hardware once they switch systems over to the cloud.

“A common mistake that enterprises make is either to throw out their old hardware or pay someone to remove it,” said Bertolucci. “[Since] the market for used IT computers and gear is north of $300 billion, … enterprises should try a hardware exchange to recoup some IT budget cash.”

Failing to Make Applications Cloud-Ready

Often companies don’t perform the testing to see how they might need to adjust applications for optimal cloud hosting performance. Recognize that you may need to make some tweaks in order to get the most out of your new environment.

Not Taking Big Data into Account

We are constantly reminded in the technology press that big data is extraordinarily valuable. However, transferring cumbersome apps and huge amounts of data can be tricky. Some firms even mail their disks to the hosting provider, says Bertolucci.

“Another thorny issue is finding the most affordable way to sync on-premises and cloud environments,” he adds. “The bottom line: Pre-move preparation is the best way to achieve smooth cloud migration.”

Assuming All Clouds Are the Same

Finally, you want to be aware that there really is no “the cloud.” Cloud computing is an infrastructural approach that is implemented in different ways by different providers.

For example, Puranik explains how Mellanox technology helps us keep prices 30-40% lower than the competition while delivering about twice the performance.

Atlantic.net offers managed, dedicated and HIPAA compliant hosting solutions – contact us today for a consultation.


Customer Surveys in the Cloud

Adnan Raja June 26, 2013 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Once you’ve got your website up and running, don’t neglect the user perspective of what they really think of your website. If you are barely comfortable with your own website development and the idea of creating forms, branched surveys, and check box fields are daunting for you, then I’ve found a few solutions here that may ease your pain.

Google Consumer Surveys


Google Consumer Surveys - Google+ - Website satisfaction by Google Consumer Surveys -- for free… | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it
From plus.google.com

Website satisfaction by Google Consumer Surveys — for free

If you are like most business owners, you know how important a healthy online community is …

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

Users will be asked to complete a four-question satisfaction survey. Surveys will run until they have received 500 responses and will start again after 30 days so you can track responses over time. This is currently limited to US English visitors on non-mobile devices.

You are initially provided with a standard set of survey questions and you can customize them depending for an extra cent per question. For those of you in the UK who don’t have access to the survey tools, you can customize your own through Google Forms. Google Forms is a drive app feature that you can embed into your website and I found the perfect article to explain this feature and a few new bonus applications by Med Karbach.

10 Great Tools to Integrate with your Google Docs


10 Great Tools to Integrate with your Google Docs ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it
From www.educatorstechnology.com

One very recent update is an increase of cloud storage capacity to 15GB usable across Gmail, Drive, and Google Plus. It is quite obvious that Google is trying to outsmart its immediate competitor Dropbox and I think Google is successful in its strategy so far.

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

Med Karbach has curated for some interesting apps that are integrated into Google Drive and which you can install right from your Google Drive interface.

I personally make use of Poll Daddy for some of my WordPress cloud hosted website installs. The added bonus of this type of plugin on your website, is that you create community interaction on your website.

4 Ideas for Crowd-sourcing Content Creation and Promotion – Business 2 Community


4 Ideas for Crowdsourcing Content Creation and Promotion - Business 2 Community | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it
From www.business2community.com

You hear a lot of this talk these days about crowd-sourcing — the idea of using a large online community to complete tasks as diverse as compiling an online encyclopedia (thank you Wikipedia!)

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

These days, myriad survey tools are available to help you reach out to your audience and get feedback. One of my favorites is PollDaddy, which is easy to use and can be directly integrated into WordPress.

 

For other one-click applications like WordPress and other great services, like our affordable cloud hosting and HIPAA compliant hosting, please visit aAtlantic.Net.

 

By Juliana


How to make a VPN

Adnan Raja June 11, 2013 by under Dedicated Hosting 0 Comments

Many companies use VPN’s or Virtual Private Networks that use gateways and secure servers in order to provide a more secure and private connection to the internet. If you want to be able to surf the internet without the prying eyes of your IP provider then check out the following websites.

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New York, NY

100 Delawanna Ave, Building 1

Clifton, NJ 07014

United States

San Francisco, CA

2820 Northwestern Pkwy,

Santa Clara, CA 95051

United States

Dallas, TX

2323 Bryan Street,

Dallas, Texas 75201

United States

Orlando, FL

440 W Kennedy Blvd, Suite 3

Orlando, FL 32810

United States

London, UK

14 Liverpool Road, Slough,

Berkshire SL1 4QZ

United Kingdom

Toronto, Canada

20 Pullman Ct, Scarborough,

Ontario M1X 1E4

Canada