Author: Brendan Bonner

How to Install LAMP on Ubuntu 15.10 (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP)

Brendan Bonner October 22, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
LAMP - Lighting created by Walker Cahall

LAMP – Lighting  created by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 10/22/15

Introduction

In this how-to we are going to show you how to install a LAMP stack on Ubuntu 15.10.  LAMP is the most common web server configurations on the web. LAMP is made up of 4 parts: Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. LAMP is the foundation for a vast array of web-based software, such as WordPress, Drupal, Joomla and other web-hosting platforms. We will be using Ubuntu 15.10 for our Linux installation in this how-to. Apache is our web server; MySQL is our database management system, and PHP is our scripting language.

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How to Install WordPress on a Debian 8.2 Cloud Server

WordPress Illustration by Walker Cahall

WordPress Illustration by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 10/20/15

Introduction

This how-to will take you through installing WordPress on Debian 8.2 “jessie”. WordPress is an open source blogging and CMS platform. WordPress has thousands of plugins that you can use to make your site customized to your needs.

Prerequisite

To install WordPress, a Debian 8.2 server running LAMP or LEMP is required. Please see our how-to guides for installing LAMP or LEMP.

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How to Install Linux, Apache, MySQL And PHP (LAMP) On A Ubuntu 12.04 Cloud Server

Verified and Tested 10/15/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we are installing a LAMP server using Ubuntu 12.04. LAMP is one of the most widespread and easy to install web server configurations out there. It consists of 4 elements; Linux (In this case Ubuntu), Apache, MySQL, and PHP.

Prerequisites

A server with Ubuntu 12.04 installed. In need of a server? Atlantic.net offers managed server hosting services which include a layer of business-essential managed services to your hosting packages. Contact us today for more information.

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How to Find The Location Of Your Servers with Traceroute and WHOIS

Brendan Bonner October 16, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Introduction

One of the most important things to consider when deploying any servers for your business or development needs is to make sure that it’s in a location that works for you. Let’s say you’ve deployed a server and then used one of the IP geolocation websites and found that your server’s IP does not match its location, what do you do?

Unfortunately, these sites, while convenient, can be very inaccurate. This how-to guide will show you some more accurate ways of finding where your server is located.

Prerequisites

A Linux, FreeBSD, or Windows Server with a static IP address assigned.

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How to Install a PHP7 LAMP Stack on CentOS 7

Brendan Bonner October 12, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
PHP7 Elephant created by Walker Cahall http://www.waltronic.net/

PHP7 Elephant created by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 10/12/15

Introduction

This how-to we will be installing PHP7  with a CentOS 7 LAMP stack. PHP7 is due to release sometime in November 2015, and it is a good time to try out PHP7 and test your code.

NOTE: PHP is still in development, do not use this in a production environment, this is only to be used for testing purposes.

Prerequisites

A CentOS 7 server is required. Need a CentOS 7 server? You can spin up a new SSD Cloud Server from Atlantic.Net

All of the commands we are using require root privileges. If you are using the root user, then you can skip the sudo in front of commands. If you do not have root access to your server, contact your server administrator.

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How to Try PHP7 on a Debian 8.2 LAMP Stack

PHP7 Elephant created by Walker Cahall http://www.waltronic.net/

PHP7 Elephant created by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 10/8/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we will be installing PHP7 on a Debian 8.2 LAMP stack. PHP7’s expected release date is sometime in November 2015. If you plan on upgrading to the new version of PHP, you can use this guide to install PHP7 so that you can test your code. This guide will be show you how to install the PHP7 Beta or Nightly Build from repo.

NOTE: Since PHP7 is in development do not use this in production, this guide is only meant to get you ready for the actual release.

Prerequisites

A server with Debian 8.2 installed is required, which will take care of the Linux portion of the LAMP stack install.

Installing LAMP on Debian 8.2 with PHP7

We need to add the PHP7 early access repo to your sources list with the following command:

echo "deb http://repos.zend.com/zend-server/early-access/php7/repos ubuntu/" >> /etc/apt/sources.list

After adding the PHP7 early access repo, we should now update the system with the following command:

apt-get update

Installing Apache on Debian 8.2

The next thing we need is to install Apache; you can do so with the following command:

apt-get install apache2

During the install, hit enter when it asks “Do you want to continue?”

Now that Apache is installed, we can check to see if it running with the following command:

service apache2 status

 Another way to check to see if Apache is working is by opening your web browser and then go to http://youripaddress

To get your IP address you can run the following command:

ifconfig
An example of ifconfig showing the IP address of 172.20.6.154

An example of ifconfig showing the IP address of 172.20.6.154

Using the above example we would put  http://172.20.6.154 in the address bar of our browser:

The default page for Apache on Debian 8.2

The default page for Apache on Debian 8.2

Installing MariaDB on Debian 8.2

We are now going to add a database management system, however, if your code does not require a database, you can skip this section. Install MariaDB with the following command:

apt-get install mariadb-server

During the install, hit enter when it asks “Do you want to continue?”

It will also prompt you to enter a MariaDB root password. Set a strong password of your choosing. After entering your password, hit enter to continue.

Enter a strong password of your choice

Enter a strong password of your choice

After hitting enter, it will prompt you to reenter the password, do so and then hit enter to continue.

Re-enter the password you set before

Re-enter the password you set before

After the install completes, we need to run the MariaDB Security installation with the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

Note: During the MariaDB Security installation, you will be prompted with a series of questions. For standard setups,  type N for the change root password question (since you just set it) and Y for yes on all of the rest, see the screen shot below:

An example of what mysql_secure_installation looks like

An example of what mysql_secure_installation looks like using MariaDB

You can check that MariaDB is running with the following command:

service mysql status

Installing PHP7 on Debian 8.2

We can now install PHP7. Below you can find the two choices of the Nightly or the Beta builds. As the nightly build is more up to date, it has more fixed bugs than the Beta version, so I would suggest the nightly.

PHP7 Nightly Build Install:

apt-get install php7-nightly

PHP7 Beta 1 Install:

apt-get install php7-beta1

During the install, hit enter when it asks “Do you want to continue?”

After hitting enter,  you will also get a warning similar to below.

WARNING: The following packages cannot be authenticated!
  php7-nightly
Install these packages without verification? [y/N]

Type Y and then hit Enter to continue.

Getting PHP7 to work with Apache

We need to move the  libraries and modules of PHP7  to the Apache directories with the following commands:

cp /usr/local/php7/libphp7.so /usr/lib/apache2/modules/
cp /usr/local/php7/php7.load /etc/apache2/mods-available/

After moving the files, we need to edit /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and add the following lines to the bottom of the file.

<FilesMatch \.php$>
SetHandler application/x-httpd-php
</FilesMatch>

Now that we fixed the apache2.conf run the following command to enable the PHP mpm module and switch to mpm_prefork.

a2dismod mpm_event && a2enmod mpm_prefork && a2enmod php7

Restart Apache so that the changes we made take effect:

service apache2 restart

Testing PHP 7 on Debian 8.2

To test out PHP7, we are going to create a PHP file a called info.php in /var/www/html/  by using your favorite editor and inserting the following lines of code.

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Now we can go back to your browser and update the following hyperlink with your IP address.

http://youripaddress/info.php

The result of the php.info file you made, using PHP7

The result of the php.info file you made, using PHP7

At the top of the page, check that the PHP version is  7.0 or higher.

Now that we verified that it is working, we should remove your info.php as hackers could use this information to set up attacks directed at the specific version of PHP you are running. Remove it with the following command:

rm /var/www/html/info.php

Congratulations on installing PHP7 with LAMP on your Debian 8.2 Server! Thank you for following this How-To, and please check back for more updates and to learn more about our reliable HIPAA-compliant cloud storage hosting solutions.


How to Try PHP7 in a LAMP Stack on Ubuntu 14.04

PHP7 Elephant created by Walker Cahall http://www.waltronic.net/

PHP7 Elephant created by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 10/8/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we will install a LAMP Stack on an Ubuntu 14.04 Cloud Server with PHP7. PHP7  should be released sometime in November 2015 and if you plan on adopting the new version, now is a great time to test your code. This guide will give you the option to install the Beta1 build or the newest nightly build of PHP7. If you’d like to learn more about PHP7, read our articles What is PHP7 – Breaking Changes from PHP5 and What is PHP7 – Performance Improvement.

NOTE: PHP7 is still in development and should not be used in production environments until it is fully released.

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How to Install Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) on Debian 8.2 Cloud Server

Brendan Bonner September 5, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
LAMP Illustration by Walker Cahall http://www.waltronic.net/

LAMP Illustration by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 09/05/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through installing LAMP on your  Debian 8.2 Cloud Server. LAMP is simply a software bundle that consists of 4 components. Linux is the base of the platform; all components are installed within the Linux environment. In this case, we will be using Debian 8.2 for the Linux OS. Apache will be used for the web service. MySQL will be used for database management,  and  PHP will be as the programming language. Altogether this forms LAMP, which is also called a LAMP Stack.

Prerequisites

A server with Debian 8.2 installed. If you do not have a server already, you can spin up a trusted and reliable cloud server in under 30 seconds.

Installing LAMP on Debian 8.2

We will first start by installing Apache. Apache is an open source web server and is the most popular web server in the world.

Installing Apache on Debian 8.2

Install Apache with the following command to begin the install:

apt-get install apache2

Verify if all is working by opening your browser and going to http://youripaddress

If you are unsure what your IP address is, run the following:

ifconfig
An example of ifconfig showing the IP of 192.68.0.2

An example of ifconfig showing the IP of 192.68.0.2

In our example, we would put http://192.68.0.2 in the address bar and get the following page:

Installing Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) On Debian 8 On A Cloud Server Or VPS 04

An Example of the default Apache page on Debian 8

Installing MySQL on Debian 8.2

Install MySQL with the following command:

sudo apt-get install mysql-server php5-mysql

During the install, it will prompt you to enter a MySQL root password. Set any password that you would like.

Installing Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) On Debian 8 On A Cloud Server Or VPS02

An example of the setting the MySQL password during install.

Secure MySQL from the default settings with the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

Note: You will be prompted with a series of questions. Simply type N for the change root password and Y for yes on all of them, see the screen shot below:

Installing Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) On Debian 8 On A Cloud Server Or VPS 03

An example of the questions during mysql_secure_installation

Installing PHP on Debian 8.2

Install PHP with the following command to begin the install:

apt-get install php5

Create a test PHP file in the following directory with the following command:

nano /var/www/html/info.php

Insert the following code in the empty space then save and exit:

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Restart Apache so all the changes take effect:

service apache2 restart

Test your page in your browser with the following hyperlink changed with your IP address:

http://youripaddress/info.php

Installing Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) On Debian 8 On A Cloud Server Or VPS 05

An example of the php.info file that was created on Debian 8.2

Congratulations! You have just installed LAMP on your Debian 8 Server. Thank you for following along in this How-To, please check back for more updates or take a look at our Installing WordPress on Debian 8 How-To!


How to Install WordPress on a CentOS 6.7 Server

WordPress Illustration by Walker Cahall

WordPress Illustration by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 08/17/15

Introduction

This how-to will show you how to install WordPress on CentOS 6.7. WordPress started as a blogging system, but now has become a full content management system (CMS). Since WordPress is a free open source program, it has become the most popular CMS on the Web. With thousands of plugins, your website is nearly limitless.

Prerequisite

– To install WordPress, a CentOS 6.7 server running LAMP or LEMP is required. Please see our how-tos for LAMP or LEMP.

Install WordPress on CentOS 6.7

To install WordPress, we are going to start off by setting up the database by running the following commands:

mysql -u root -p

When prompted, enter your MySQL root password that you set up when installing MySQL.

In MySQL, enter the following commands:

create database wordpress character set utf8 collate utf8_bin;

Make sure you set your own secure password where it says [insert-password-here]

grant all privileges on wordpress.* to [email protected] identified by '[insert-password-here]';
flush privileges;
exit

Now that the database is created, we can download the latest version of WordPress with the following command:

wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

Note: if wget is not installed, install it by running the command:

yum install wget

The latest package will download to the directory you are currently in, with the file name latest.tar.gz. We need to decompress the file by running:

tar -xzvf latest.tar.gz

Next, we need to copy wp-config-sample.php to wp-config.php which is where WordPress gets its base configuration. To do that run:

cp wordpress/wp-config-sample.php wordpress/wp-config.php

In your favorite text editor, edit wordpress/wp-config.php

For a basic setup, we need to have the following.

define(‘DB_NAME’, ‘wordpress’);

define(‘DB_USER’, ‘wordpressuser’);

define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, ‘[insert-password-here]’);

It should look like this when completed:

Enter DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD, DB_HOST values.

wp-config.php

 

Next, we need to move the WordPress folder to your web directory.

sudo cp -r ~/wordpress/* /var/www/html

We now can go to the WordPress web installation. In your browser go to http://yourhostname-or-ipaddress

If you are unsure what you IP address is run the following:

ifconfig
Sample ifconfig

ifconfig

In our example, we would put http://192.68.0.2/ in the address bar and get the following page.

 

Fill in your sites infromation, username, password and email addressa accordingly.

Welcome Page

 

From here all that is needed to do is to follow along with the WordPress install and give the information required. For more information, you may want to check out the WordPress Codex.

Atlantic.net offers managed server hosting which include a layer of business-essential managed services to your hosting packages. Contact us today for more information.


How to Install Zabbix Server on a CentOS 6.7 Server

Brendan Bonner August 12, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Zabbix Vision by Walker Cahall

Zabbix Vision by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 11/23/15

Introduction

This how-to will show you how to install Zabbix 2.4 Server on a CentOS 6 installation. Zabbix is an open source monitoring tool that is ideal for monitoring your cloud servers. However, it can monitor many other types of devices. Installing Zabbix can help you find issues with your server before an outage occurs.

Prerequisite

– A CentOS 6.7 server running LAMP. Please see this post for details on installing LAMP on CentOS 6.7.

–  If you do not have a CentOS 6.7 server, try a Cloud Server today!

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