Cloud Hosting

How Should You Prepare for the Next Wave of Ransomware, Malware, Network and File Vulnerabilities?

Adnan Raja August 8, 2019 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Cybersecurity is a hot topic in the IT industry, as IT sector is one of the industries most frequently targeted by malware and ransomware hackers. IT businesses store and handle an abundance of sensitive and valuable data belonging to third parties, government, healthcare and legal entities to name a few, making them a prime target.

Read More


Top 5 Ways To Speed Up A Slow Website

Brandon Schroth July 11, 2019 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Website speed optimization is the make-or-break of user experience. Data shows that user engagement decreases by a whopping 25% for every second increase in a site’s loading time. The digi-world is marked by the very construct that it’s so much easier to get things done online. The World Wide Web is a competing space where the race is on to minimize user input and maximize the time of engagement. A well-designed website becomes redundant when its speed performance is below par, leading to higher churn rates and consequently a lower ROI.

Read More


What you should know before enabling IPv6

Marty April 16, 2019 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

As our members roll out IPv6 on our Cloud Platform, I thought it would be a good idea to share some of our findings that will help make jumping into the IPv6 universe easier for you. Hopefully, this saves you some time and effort in your IPv6 deployment.

Most people deploying IPv6 are using dual-stack implementations – meaning they have IPv4 and IPv6 running and allowing traffic on both types of network addresses. We assume you’re already familiar with IPv4 and are now looking to start using IPv6.

Read More



Why Atlantic.Net Chose NGINX

Adnan Raja August 24, 2018 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

This article also appears on NGINX’s blog. Read at NGINX >

Traditionally, web development and hosting were done primarily using the LAMP stack – LAMP being short for Linux (operating system), Apache (web server), MySQL (database), and PHP (programming language), the core components which were then used to run enterprise sites.

As web stacks and load balancers become more agile, and as business needs dictate better performance and stability, it is becoming increasingly common to replace Apache HTTP Server with a lightweight and highly scalable alternative, NGINX. With NGINX, the stack becomes known as LEMP – Linux, (e)NGINX, MySQL, PHP.

Read More


Is the Cloud a Good Fit to Host Your Augmented Reality Project?

Adnan Raja February 16, 2018 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

When you hear ‘augmented reality,’ you might initially think about the first-down marker that overlays the field on any televised football game. The markers have become so ubiquitous that you almost forget the players can’t see them when they’re diving for the extra yardage.

If you’re under 25, ‘augmented reality’ might conjure memories of Pokemon Go instead.

But let’s take augmented reality beyond the realm of masses converging on shopping malls and college campuses in search of non-existent pocket monsters, beyond the overlays on a football field, beyond the technology giants like Apple and Google who are bringing augmented reality to our daily lives, and consider the niche players. Plenty of industries, like construction, have the vision to layer an augmented world on top of our own to give architects, engineers and customers a look at what could be before the job is built.

Read More


How to Choose the Best Cloud Hosting Platform for Your Analytics Software

Adnan Raja February 12, 2018 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

You could ask 50 different CEOs why they are moving their businesses to the cloud and get 50 different answers. But one of the biggest reasons we’re seeing so much migration to the cloud is because of the exponential growth in data being gathered, stored and analyzed across the economy as a whole.

Most businesses already have complex, dedicated analytic software in place well before they move to the cloud. This analytic software assists employees in making decisions on marketing, advertising, customer retention, supply chains, packing/shipping, warehouse management, delivery routes, human resources and more.

Read More


How to: Getting started with Windows Containers and Docker

Editorial Team June 1, 2017 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Introduction

This article is a basic primer on how to use Windows Server 2016 with Containers and Docker on the Atlantic.Net Cloud. Docker popularized containers first on Linux, but now with Windows 2016, Windows containers are now natively supported as well. This means you can build your application in a container and ship it across your development and production environments knowing that it will work and run the exact same way on every device.

In this tutorial, we will deploy a web page in an IIS container from a Microsoft-distributed IIS container image. Let’s get started with a quick tutorial!

Deploying an Atlantic.Net Cloud Server

First, we need to deploy a new Windows 2016 with Containers server from the Atlantic.Net Cloud.

  • Log in to https://cloud.atlantic.net. Atlantic.net cloud login
  • Click “+ Add Server.”
  • On the “Add a Server” page, enter the following:
  • Server Name: What you’d like your server’s name to be. For example, “Windows 2016 Docker.”
  • Location: The data center you want your server created in.
  • Type: Under the “Operating Systems” tab, select “Windows,” and then select “2016 Datacenter (with Containers/Docker).”
  • Term: Do you want month-to-month, on-demand pricing, or do you want a one or three year term commitment for this server?
  • Plan: We recommended at least a G2.2GB plan size for Windows-based servers, due to memory requirements.
  • Enable Backups: Do you want your server backed up by us daily?Docker selection
  • Click “Create Server” to begin the provisioning of the server. The next page will have your login credentials for the new server displayed. Please save these somewhere so you can use them to log in. Note: The credentials will also be emailed to you.

Logging in to Windows 2016

Once the server is done provisioning, you will need to log into Windows 2016. Click here to find out how to remotely log in.

Checking Your Docker Version

Ensure that Docker is actually installed by running the “docker version” command from the Windows command prompt (cmd.exe).

C:\Users\Administrator>docker version

Client:
 Version:      17.03.1-ee-3
 API version:  1.27
 Go version:   go1.7.5
 Git commit:   3fcee33
 Built:        Thu Mar 30 19:31:22 2017
 OS/Arch:      windows/amd64

Server:
 Version:      17.03.1-ee-3
 API version:  1.27 (minimum version 1.24)
 Go version:   go1.7.5
 Git commit:   3fcee33
 Built:        Thu Mar 30 19:31:22 2017
 OS/Arch:      windows/amd64
 Experimental: false

Running Your First IIS Container

The first step is to retrieve the Microsoft distributed IIS container. We could do this with the docker pull command (ie: docker pull microsoft/iis). However, in the interest of simplicity, we can skip this step and go straight to launching our first container. Docker will automatically pull down the necessary image (and any dependent images) if they don’t already exist locally.

Note: We are going to set some properties of the container when we run the command:

  • Name: The name of the container. In this case, we would specify the name by entering “–name myIIS.”
  • Ports: You can specify what ports you want open on the server. You do this by binding the internal ports of your container to an external port so it is accessible publicly. In this case, we are binding port 80 (the web port) of the container to port 80 of our Cloud Server with “-p 80:80“.

Docker will automatically pull down the necessary image (and any dependent images) if they don’t already exist locally.

C:\Users\Administrator>docker run -d --name myIIS -p 80:80 microsoft/iis
Unable to find image 'microsoft/iis:latest' locally
latest: Pulling from microsoft/iis
3889bb8d808b: Pull complete
6d4d50238ed1: Pull complete
0606d7d474d1: Pull complete
672755d284cd: Pull complete
88f5b9741695: Pull complete
d53dd94c8474: Pull complete
Digest: sha256:bcbcb3b442bc5f0ab3b8b769b52584d98751861b5e438b866d59287cc8112f10
Status: Downloaded newer image for microsoft/iis:latest
2614436cb74c8a21c77e071e13fb5937c12f8946ce8e3c7044e24216cae4100b

Your container is now running, which you can check with the following command:

C:\Users\Administrator>docker ps -a
CONTAINER ID        IMAGE               COMMAND                   CREATED             STATUS              PORTS                NAMES
2614436cb74c        microsoft/iis       "C:\\ServiceMonitor..."   4 days ago          Up 4 days           0.0.0.0:80->80/tcp   myIIS

Next, we will login to the container and start a Windows command prompt (cmd.exe) in the container to enter interactive commands:

C:\Users\Administrator>docker exec -i myIIS cmd
Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.14393]
(c) 2016 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

C:\>

Now that you are logged into the container, we are going to remove the default IIS web server start page so we can add our own index page:

del C:\inetpub\wwwroot\iisstart.htm

Now add your own content to the index.html page:

echo "Nice! My first container is displaying this text on my index page!" > C:\inetpub\wwwroot\index.html

Now open a browser and type in the IP address of your Cloud Server into the URL field. You should now see your index page:

iis container

 

Back in the CMD prompt, type exit to exit the interactive session of the container:

C:\>exit
exit

C:\Users\Administrator>

Building and Deploying a Docker Container with Your Changes

Now that the container is configured the way you want, you can save the container to a new container image for future use. First, we need to grab the name of the container from the “docker ps -a” command and stop the container:

C:\Users\Administrator>docker ps -a
CONTAINER ID        IMAGE               COMMAND                   CREATED             STATUS              PORTS                NAMES
2614436cb74c        microsoft/iis       "C:\\ServiceMonitor..."   4 days ago          Up 4 days           0.0.0.0:80->80/tcp   myIIS
C:\Users\Administrator>docker stop myIIS
myIIS

Create the new container with “docker commit <current name> <new image name>“. In our case the current name is “myIIS“:

C:\Users\Administrator>docker commit myIIS configured-iis
sha256:4d08b0a5561e11817d199d6d55d46497ce1d4221384d5c29b4c622d44cceed9c

Verify the new image has been created:

C:\Users\Administrator>docker images
REPOSITORY          TAG                 IMAGE ID            CREATED             SIZE
configured-iis      latest              4d08b0a5561e        44 seconds ago      10.5 GB
microsoft/iis       latest              9e66ceefdc5a        2 weeks ago         10.4 GB

The container we just created can now be deployed for future use:

docker run -d --name web01 -p 80:80 configured-iis

Now stop the new container and delete it:

C:\Users\Administrator>docker stop web01
web01
C:\Users\Administrator>docker rm web01
web01

Finishing Up

The above was just a basic tutorial.  You can also do interesting things like automating the build of container images using DockerFiles, pushing the images to a centralized repository, and creating redundancy and automatic failover by having multiple nodes setup in a Docker Swarm. Enjoy!



Cloud Backend: The Chief Concern for IoT Standards?

Sam Guiliano July 27, 2016 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

The Internet of thing is growing at a breathtaking pace. That means connectivity at both home and work will become more and more complex. As the IoT makes computing increasingly complicated, some say we should be concerned primarily with the backend rather than interoperability.

  • Speed of IoT Growth
  • A Jumble of Disconnected Cloud Services
  • The Issue of Interoperability
  • Changing the IoT Standardization Focus to the Backend
  • Cloud that Meets Rigorous Standards

Speed of IoT Growth

The Internet of things is expanding at a rapid rate as enterprises and vendors are becoming more aware of the possibilities presented by this all-inclusive approach to connectivity. The IoT market was forecast last year by IDC to grow at a whopping 16.9% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) between 2014 and 2020, rising from $655.8 billion to $1.7 trillion. To put that into perspective, it’s nearly as fast as the growth of public cloud, which is predicted by IDC to achieve a 19.4% CAGR between 2015 and 2019; and keep in mind that much of that public cloud growth will actually be because of the growth of IoT.

Read More


New York, NY

100 Delawanna Ave, Suite 1

Clifton, NJ 07014

United States

San Francisco, CA

2820 Northwestern Pkwy,

Santa Clara, CA 95051

United States

Dallas, TX

2323 Bryan Street,

Dallas, Texas 75201

United States

Ashburn, VA

1807 Michael Faraday Ct,

Reston, VA 20190

United States

Orlando, FL

440 W Kennedy Blvd, Suite 3

Orlando, FL 32810

United States

Toronto, Canada

20 Pullman Ct, Scarborough,

Ontario M1X 1E4

Canada

London, UK

14 Liverpool Road, Slough,

Berkshire SL1 4QZ

United Kingdom

Resources

We use cookies for advertising, social media and analytics purposes. Read about how we use cookies in our updated Privacy Policy. If you continue to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.