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How to Install Apache on Arch Linux

Jose Velazquez June 19, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 05/29/15

Introduction

This how-to will help you install and configure Apache on an Arch Linux server. Apache is a web server that is very popular in Linux systems and over the Internet. It is used by many web hosting companies worldwide because of its popularity and efficiency in hosting sites over the World Wide Web.

Prerequisites

You need an Arch Linux server that is configured with a static IP address. If you do not have a server already, Atlantic.Net offers a full line of SSD Cloud Hosting that will have you up and running in under 30 seconds.

Server Preparation

To get started, log in to your Arch Linux server. Let’s make sure that your server is fully up-to-date.

sudo pacman -Syu

With the server up-to-date, we can continue the process and install Apache on your Arch Linux server.

Install Apache on Arch Linux

We must first begin by installing Apache with the following command:

sudo pacman -S apache

Start the Apache service with the following command:

sudo systemctl start httpd

To edit the main Apache configuration file for one or many websites, according to your preference, open the configuration file located in the following directory:

sudo nano /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

In order to test the installation, create a test HTML file in the following directory with the command below:

sudo nano /srv/http/index.html

Insert the following HTML code in the empty file then save and exit:

<html>
<body>
<h1>CONGRATULATIONS</h1>
<h2>You have just installed Apache on your Arch Linux Server</h2>
</body>
</html>

You can now verify that Apache is installed correctly by typing http:// and your IP address in your browser.

http://YOUR.IP.ADD.RESS

To get your server’s public IP address, type the following command:

curl icanhazip.com
This is the test page created to verify the Apache install in Arch Linux.

This is the test page created to verify the Apache install in Arch Linux.

What Next?

Congratulations! You now have a server installed and configured with Apache. You may now continue building your website(s). Thank you for following along, and feel free to check back with us for further updates.


Cloud VPS vs. Traditional VPS vs. Private Cloud

Adnan Raja June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

VPS Changing with the Cloud

A critical concern when exploring hosting solutions is deciding whether you want to go with the innovative, newer option or to stick with the traditional model.  Public Cloud Hosting has grown astronomically in recent years. Perhaps 2014 was the year that cloud graduated from test projects and startups to enterprise acceptance, with General Electric announcing that it was already running 90% of new applications through the public cloud.

Read More


How to: Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP

Atlantic.Net NOC June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified 05-06-2015

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through getting started with your Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP cloud server and verify everything is installed correctly.

LAMP is a software bundle that consists of four components. Linux (L) is the core platform which the other components run on. Apache (A) is used to host web services. MySQL (M) is used for database management. PHP (P) is used for the back-end coding language.

Prerequisites

A server with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP. If you do not have a server already, you can visit spin up a dependable server in under 30 seconds.

Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 – LAMP

First, we will want to sign into our cloud control panel here

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LAMP

Cloud control panel login page

 

Once logged in, we will see our list of servers. To add an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP already installed, we would click on “Add Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Adding a Server

 

You will be sent to a page to fill out the following:

-Server Name: Name the server whatever you’d like, it’s a cosmetic choice that does not impact server functionality. It’s there to help you manage your servers.

-Location: Select which Atlantic.Net Cloud Platform you want your server hosted on. For best overall best performance, select the location closes to you.

1) In this tutorial, we chose USA-East-1.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your Server location

 

-Operating System you would want to choose which will be “Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Server 64-bit – LAMP”

1) You would first click on “Applications”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your OS Type

 

2) Then click on “LAMP”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LAMP

Choosing your OS type

 

-Plan size of your choice. This will depend on what you will be using the server for. You are able to scale up the server at anytime but unable to scale down. You are able to view more detail for each plan on our cloud server pricing page.

1) In this tutorial, we clicked on the “Small” plan size

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your Plan size

 

-If you would like to enable backups for your server then you would check the box beside “Enable Backups”. Daily backups cost 20% of your server’s monthly price (minimum $1). Once enabled, you are able to restore your server to a previous date through the cloud control panel. You are able to enable/disable backups at any time as well.

After you have completed filling everything out, click on “Create Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LAMP

Creating the server

 

You will then be sent to a page with the server details including the server credentials. You are also emailed the server credentials.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LAMP

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – LAMP Server Details

 

Once your server is provisioned, you will need to SSH into your server. You can navigate to here if you are not sure how to SSH into your server.

Once you have logged into your server, you will see the provided LAMP Notes.

Note: Make note of your current “root database password” as we will need it later to change it to a user-defined password for security reasons.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

LAMP Notes

 

You will want to verify everything was installed correctly and are working. To check Apache, go to http://<serveripaddress> , if it is installed, then you will see this.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

Apache Default Page

 

To verify MySQL is installed and working, run the following command

service mysql status

You will see this result if it is running

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

MySQL status

 

To make your MySQL more secure and to change the database root password from the provided one, run the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

You will first be prompted to enter the current root password for MySQL which was provided in the LAMP Notes when you first logged into your server.

Once you have entered the correct password, you will be asked if you want to change the root password, you would type “y” and then enter if you would like to change it. After changing your password, you will be prompted to answer a couple more questions which will make your MySQL secure by removing anonymous users, disallowing root login remotely, removing the test database and access to it (Ignore error as database does not exist) and then reloading the privilege tables. Once done, you are complete with MySQL!

Verifying PHP

To verify PHP is installed and working properly, we will create a basic PHP script. In this article, we will save it under the web root directory as test.php. In Ubuntu 14.04, the web root directory is located at /var/www/html. We will create the file at that location by running the following command:

nano /var/www/html/test.php

This will open an empty file, we want to input the following text.

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Save and close the file.

We will now test if the server can generate the PHP script. You will want to go to your browser and enter the following URL:

http://<serveripaddress>/test.php

If your server is able to translate the PHP script correctly, you will see something similar to the below picture.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

PHP Information page

 

Once you have verified all components of the LAMP installation, you are able to begin configurations for your site!

Come back and check for updates!


How to Install LAMP (Apache, MariaDB, PHP) on a CentOS 7.2 Cloud Server

Brendan Bonner June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
LAMP Magic In Your Hands created by Walker Cahall

LAMP Magic In Your Hands created by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 12/31/15

Introduction

This how-to will show you a basic installation of LAMP on a CentOS 7.2 Cloud Server. LAMP, on CentOS 7.2, is a software bundle consisting of four components: Linux, Apache, MariaDB, and PHP. LAMP is the backbone for a wide variety of web-based software, such as WordPress and other web-hosting platforms. We will be using CentOS 7.2 for our Linux installation in this how-to. CentOS 7.2 implements systemd which will make this guide very different than the CentOS LAMP articles you may have seen in the past. Additionally the default database engine used by CentOS 7 is MariaDB and not MySQL. MariaDB is a forked version of MySQL, so most of the functionality that you may know from MySQL is built into MariaDB. We will be using Apache for our web server and PHP for our scripting language.

Prerequisites

A server with CentOS 7.2 installed is required, which will take care of the Linux portion of the LAMP stack install. If you do not have a CentOS 7.2 server, why not consider a CentOS SSD Cloud server from Atlantic.Net.

This how-to requires a user with root credentials. If you are using the root user, then you can omit the sudo in front of commands.

Install LAMP on CentOS 7.2

We need to take care of a few things before we can install Apache.

First, we should make sure the system is updated by running the following command:

sudo yum update

If this command finds updates to install, you will be prompted with ‘Is this ok?’ Hit Y and then enter.

Next, we need to update our firewall to allow HTTP and HTTPS traffic.

Check to see if your firewall is running by running

sudo systemctl status firewalld

If the firewall is not running, run the following command:

sudo systemctl start firewalld

If you want the firewall to start when CentOS 7.2 boots up, run the following command:

sudo systemctl enable firewalld

To allow HTTP and HTTPS, run the following commands:

sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=http
sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=https

You need to run the following command so that the rules above take effect.

sudo firewall-cmd --reload

Now that we have taken care of those things, we can install Apache.

Installing Apache on CentOS 7.2

We will be installing Apache with yum, which is the default package manager for CentOS 7.2. Apache is a free open-source web server.

Install Apache with the following command:

sudo yum install httpd

During the install, it will prompt “Is this ok?” Hit Y and then enter.

We now need to start Apache by running the command:

sudo systemctl start httpd.service

We can now verify Apache is working by opening your browser and entering the URL http://your-server's-address. you should get a “Testing 123” page similar to the image below.

Note: If you do not know your IP address, run the following command:

ip addr show eth0
An example of running the command: ip addr show eth0 and getting 192.168.100.10 for the IP address.

An example of running the command: ip addr show eth0 and getting 192.168.100.10 for the IP address.

In our example we would put http://192.168.100.10 into our browser’s address bar.

 

The default web page when installing Apache on CentOS 7

The default web page when installing Apache on CentOS 7

 

To have Apache enabled when your CentOS 7.2 systems starts up, run the following command:

sudo systemctl enable httpd.service

Also, if you would like to check the status of Apache, you can run the following command:

sudo systemctl status httpd.service

If you would like to test your Apache configuration before restarting, use the following command:

sudo apachectl configtest

To restart Apache gracefully and avoid noticeable downtime, use the following command:

sudo apachectl graceful

If it becomes necessary, or if you aren’t worried about downtime, you can perform a hard restart of Apache using the following command:

systemctl restart httpd.service

To see the version of Apache that is installed, you can use the following command:

httpd -v

Now that Apache is installed we can move on to installing MariaDB.

Installing MariaDB on CentOS 7.2

We will also be using yum to install MariaDB. MariaDB is a free and open-source relational database management system. MariaDB has been designed so that its version number is compatible with the same version number of MySQL but with added features (i.e,. MariaDB 5.5 is compatible with MySQL 5.5).

Install MariaDB with the following command:

sudo yum install mariadb-server mariadb

During the install, it will prompt “Is this ok?” Hit Y and then enter.

Start the MariaDB service with the following command:

sudo systemctl start mariadb

We now need to set up MariaDB with the following command:

sudo mysql_secure_installation

This setup process will prompt you to answer a series of questions. First, it will ask you to enter the current root password. Since we have just set it up, there should not be one, so simply hit enter.

In order to log into MariaDB to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user.  If you've just installed MariaDB, and
you haven't set the root password yet, the password will be blank,
so you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none):
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Next, it will ask you if you would like to set a new root password. Press Y and then Enter. It will then ask you to enter a password. We recommend you set a strong root DB password that is different than any user’s password, including the root user. Then re-enter it.

Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MariaDB
root user without the proper authorisation.

Set root password? [Y/n] y
New password:
Re-enter new password:
Password updated successfully!

From there, you can typically just hit Y for each of the next questions, as below unless you need something specific.

By default, a MariaDB installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
to log into MariaDB without having to have a user account created for
them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
production environment.

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

By default, MariaDB comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
before moving into a production environment.

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] y
 - Dropping test database...
 ... Success!
 - Removing privileges on test database...
 ... Success!

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...

All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MariaDB
installation should now be secure.

Thanks for using MariaDB!

To see if the MariaDB service is running, you can run the command:

sudo systemctl status mariadb

Now that MariaDB is set up, we will want it enabled on startup by issuing the following command:

sudo systemctl enable mariadb.service

To log into MariaDB, use the following command (note that it’s the same command you would use to log into a MySQL database):

mysql -u root -p

This same command will also display the version of MariaDB currently running, once you’ve successfully logged in. Now that we’ve installed MariaDB, we can move onto installing PHP.

Installing PHP on CentOS 7.2

Once again, we will be installing PHP from yum. PHP is a free and open-source server-side scripting language.

Install PHP with the following command:

sudo yum install php php-mysql

During the install, it will prompt “Is this ok?” Hit Y and then enter.

Create a test PHP file in the following directory. We use nano, but you may use your preferred text editor.

sudo nano /var/www/html/info.php

Insert the following code, then save and exit:

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

To save your work and close nano, hit Ctrl-X, confirm with “Y”, and then Enter.

Restart Apache so all the changes take effect:

sudo systemctl restart httpd.service

We can now test that PHP is working by opening up your browser and going to http://your-server's-address/info.php. You should get a page similar to the image below.

 

A default php.info web page that shows when PHP is installed on CentOS 7

A default php.info web page that shows when PHP is installed on CentOS 7

 

To see the version of PHP that is installed, you can use the following command:

php -v

Once you have verified that PHP works as expected, it is a good idea to remove the info.php file, since it contains information that could make your server vulnerable.

You can remove it by running the following command:

sudo rm /var/www/html/info.php

It will ask “rm: remove regular file ‘/var/www/html/info.php’?” Hit Y and then enter.

You now have a basic LAMP stack on CentOS 7.2. You can now start placing your site in the /var/www/html/ directory.

Below, you will find some optional settings that you may want to add to your LAMP server.

Additional Modules for Apache and PHP (Optional)

You may want to install some additional modules for Apache and PHP. You can search for basic modules via yum.

For Apache:

yum search mod_

For PHP:

yum search php-

To install packages, you may want to add use yum install followed by the package name.

Note: If you would like more information on a particular package, you can use the command:

yum info package-name

For a full list of Apache modules, go to http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/directives.html.

For a full list of PHP modules, go to http://php.net/manual/en/extensions.alphabetical.php.

Install phpMyAdmin (Optional)

To efficiently manage your databases, you may want to add phpMyAdmin to your LAMP stack. phpMyAdmin is a free and open-source tool written in PHP. It is a web GUI with which you can add, delete, or modify databases and tables, among other things.

To install phpMyAdmin easily on CentOS 7.2, we are going to install the Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) repo first by running the following command:

sudo yum install epel-release

During the install, it will prompt “Is this ok?” Hit Y and then Enter.

Now we can install phpMyAdmin.

sudo yum install phpmyadmin

During the phpMyAdmin install, it will prompt “Is this ok?” for the install and then the EPEL key. Hit Y and then Enter for each question.

The phpMyAdmin installation process will make a configuration file in /etc/httpd/conf.d/ called phpMyAdmin.conf. By default, phpMyAdmin is configured only to accept connections from the server it is installed on. If you want to allow other IPs you’ll need to open the phpMyAdmin.conf file with your preferred text editor.

sudo nano /etc/httpd/conf.d/phpMyAdmin.conf

In this example, we are using Apache 2.4, so we only need to change the configurations for 2.4. There will be two places that say “Require ip 127.0.0.1,” Below each one we are going to put “Require ip {your-public-IP}” For the purpose of this example, we’ll say we want to grant phpMyAdmin access to a workstation with an IP of 192.168.0.2. In this case, we would put “Require ip 192.168.0.2” below “Require ip 127.0.0.1” If you do not know your public IP, you can find it here.

The configuration file should like the one below when completed.

   <IfModule mod_authz_core.c>
     # Apache 2.4
     <RequireAny>
        Require ip 127.0.0.1
        Require ip 192.168.0.2
        Require ip ::1
     </RequireAny>
   </IfModule>
   <IfModule !mod_authz_core.c>
     # Apache 2.2
     Order Deny,Allow
     Deny from All
     Allow from 127.0.0.1
     Allow from ::1
   </IfModule>
</Directory>

<Directory /usr/share/phpMyAdmin/setup/>
   <IfModule mod_authz_core.c>
     # Apache 2.4
     <RequireAny>
        Require ip 127.0.0.1
        Require ip 192.168.0.2
        Require ip ::1
     </RequireAny>
   </IfModule>
   <IfModule !mod_authz_core.c>
     # Apache 2.2
     Order Deny,Allow
     Deny from All
     Allow from 127.0.0.1
     Allow from ::1
   </IfModule>
</Directory>

In Nano to save a close, hit Ctrl+X and then Y and then Enter.

Note: When adding allowed IPs to this file, be sure you only add the IPs for users who require access. The more access you allow, you more you may also increase your server’s exposure to exploit.

Now, we can restart Apache so that the changes take place:

sudo systemctl restart httpd.service

To get to the login page, you need to once again open your browser and go to http://your-server's-address/phpMyAdmin/. You should get a page that looks like the image below.

An example of the phpMyAdmin login page

An example of the phpMyAdmin login page

You can sign in with the root MariaDB credentials that you set up earlier. Once logged in, you should get a page similar to the one below.

An example of the phpMyAdmin default page.

An example of the phpMyAdmin default page.

Using this interface, you can now simply manage your databases on you LAMP server.

Congratulations! You have just installed a LAMP stack on your CentOS 7.2 Cloud Server. Thank you for following along in this How-To, and check back with us for any new updates. You may want to follow the guides on changing the CentOS 7.2. hostname or spend some time learning the basic setup tasks of CentOS 7.2.


How to: Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP

Atlantic.Net NOC June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified 05-06-2015

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through getting started with your Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP cloud server and verify everything is installed correctly.

LEMP is a software bundle that consists of four components. Linux (L) is the core platform which the other components run on. Nginx (E) is used to host web services. MySQL (M) is used for database management. PHP (P) is used for the back-end coding language.

Prerequisites

A server with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP. If you do not have a server already, you can spin up a reliable and trusted server from Atlantic.Net.

Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 – LEMP

First, we will want to sign into our cloud control panel here

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Cloud control panel login page

 

Once logged in, we will see our list of servers. To add an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP already installed, we would click on “Add Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Adding a Server

 

You will be sent to a page to fill out the following:

-Server Name: Name the server whatever you’d like, it’s a cosmetic choice that does not impact server functionality. It’s there to help you manage your servers.

-Location: Select which Atlantic.Net Cloud Platform you want your server hosted on. For best overall best performance, select the location closes to you.

1) In this tutorial, we chose USA-East-1.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Choosing your Server location

 

-Operating System you would want to choose which for this article will be “Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Server 64-bit – LEMP”

1) You would first click on “Applications”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your OS Type

 

2) Then click on “LEMP”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your OS Type

 

-Plan size of your choice. This will depend on what you will be using the server for. You are able to scale up the server at anytime but unable to scale down. You are able to view more detail for each plan here on our cloud server pricing page.

1) In this tutorial, we clicked on the “Small” plan size

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your Plan size

 

-If you would like to enable backups for your server then you would check the box beside “Enable Backups”. Daily backups cost 20% of your server’s monthly price (minimum $1). Once enabled, you are able to restore your server to a previous date through the cloud control panel. You are able to enable/disable backups at any time as well.

After you have completed filling everything out, click on “Create Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Creating the server

 

You will then be sent to a page with the server details including the server credentials. You are also emailed the server credentials.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Newly provisioned Server details

 

Once your server is provisioned, you will need to SSH into your server. You can navigate to here if you are not sure how to SSH into your server.

Once you have logged into your server, you will see the provided LEMP Notes to help us verify everything.

NOTE: Make note of your current “root database password” as we will need it later to change it to a user-defined password for security reasons.

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

LEMP Notes

 

You will want to verify everything was installed correctly and is working. To check Nginx, go to http://<serveripaddress> , if it is installed, then you will see this default Nginx page.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Nginx Default Page

 

Verifying MySQL

To verify MySQL is installed and working, run the following command

service mysql status

You will see this result if it is running

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

MySQL Status

To make your MySQL more secure and to change the database root password from the provided one, run the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

You will first be prompted to enter the current root password for MySQL which was provided in the LEMP Notes when you first logged into your server.

Once you have entered the correct password, you will be asked if you want to change the root password, you would type “y” and then enter if you would like to change it. After changing your password, you will be prompted to answer a couple more questions which will make your MySQL secure by removing anonymous users, disallowing root login remotely, removing the test database and access to it (Ignore error as database does not exist) and then reloading the privilege tables. Once done, you are complete with MySQL!

Verifying PHP

To verify PHP is installed and working properly, we will create a basic PHP script. In this article, we will save it under the web root directory as test.php. In Ubuntu 14.04, the web root directory is located at /usr/share/nginx/html. We will create the file at that location by running the following command:

nano /usr/share/nginx/html/test.php

This will open an empty file, we want to input the following text.

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Save and close the file.

We will now test if the server can generate the PHP script. You will want to go to your browser and enter the following URL:

http://<serveripaddress>/test.php

If your server is able to translate the PHP script correctly, you will see something similar to the below picture.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

PHP Information page

Once you have verified all components of the LEMP installation, you are able to begin configurations for your site!

Come back and check for updates, and spin up a reliable Cloud Server from Atlantic.Net.


How to Become HIPAA-Compliant

One of the problems with our increasingly technological world is that the speed at which our devices and services upgrade and make older versions obsolete can be dizzying. It feels like only an instant before the latest smartphone or flatscreen TV is being replaced with the bigger, better, faster model.

The same holds true in the world of hosting, data information, and server management. And while it can be tough to keep up for any type of business, it’s crucially important if your company is involved with health care IT and has to maintain HIPAA Compliance.

Read More


Dropbox set up for a Linux Cloud Server

Michael Douse June 17, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 04/28/15

Introduction

In this article, we will go over how to set up Dropbox via command line on a Linux Cloud Server. Dropbox is an excellent tool for making your files easy to share.

Prerequisites

-Any 32-bit or 64-bit Linux server. If you do not know if your system is 32-bit or 64-bit, follow our guide here, or if you need a secure and trusted Cloud server, consider one from Atlantic.Net.

– You will also need a Dropbox account, which you can sign up for one here.

Install Dropbox on your Linux system

Change to the root of your home directory and download the required files based on your architecture:

The command cd ~ takes you to your login directory which it typically your home directory.

32-Bit:

wget -O - "https://www.dropbox.com/download?plat=lnx.x86" | tar xzf -

64-Bit:

wget -O - "https://www.dropbox.com/download?plat=lnx.x86_64" | tar xzf -

If you run the ls -a command, you will see a newly created .dropbox-dist folder.

To start the daemon, run the command:

.dropbox-dist/dropboxd

This computer isn’t linked to any Dropbox account…
Please visit https://YOUR-SPECIFIC-LINK to link this device.

Paste the link provided into your desktop web browser, and then login with your account information. Once logged in, check your terminal again. You should see the following:

This computer is now linked to Dropbox. Welcome YOUR-NAME

At this time, your files are being synced to the Dropbox folder that was created in the home folder of your current user. This can take a while, depending on how many files you have.

Now verify that your files were all synced:

ls Dropbox/

Next we will download the command line management script. This script requires Python, so make sure you have it installed. You can see if Python is installed with python -V

wget https://www.dropbox.com/download?dl=packages/dropbox.py -O dropbox_manager.py
chmod +x dropbox_manager.py

Run the script to review the available commands:

./dropbox_manager.py
An example of the ./dropbox_manager.py for Dropbox

An example of what the ./dropbox_manager.py looks like

That’s it! You can now check the status of your synced files and manage other aspects of Dropbox.


How to Set Up a Mount & Blade: Warband Dedicated Server on CentOS

Michael Douse June 16, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

2015-04-27 15_17_34-Mount&Blade Warband - TaleWorlds Entertainment

Verified and Tested 04/27/15

Introduction

In this article, we will go over how to set up a Mount & Blade: Warband dedicated server in a freshly provisioned CentOS 6.5 cloud server.

Prerequisites

-You will need to provision a CentOS 6.5 (64 bit) VPS.

-If you do not have a server, consider a CentOS server from Atlantic.Net.  The Recommended plan for this game is the Medium plan.

Install Mount & Blade: Warband dedicated server on CentOS

First we will need to install the EPEL repository:

yum install epel-release -y

Now update system packages and EPEL database:

yum update -y

And finally, all the required packages:

yum install tmux nano wine unzip wget -y

Note: Wine will take several minutes to install so be patient.


Now to open up the require ports in the firewall. The default ports needed for steam and non-steam users are 7240 and 7241. Let us open these up in IPtables:

nano /etc/sysconfig/iptables

Add the following lines before the REJECT rules:

-A INPUT -p tcp --match multiport --dports 7240,7241 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p udp --match multiport --dports 7240,7241 -j ACCEPT
An example of the iptables file after adding the additional rules.

An example of the iptables file after adding the additional rules.

Once you are done, save your changes and exit from nano with CTRL O + Enter, and CTRL X.

Then restart IPtables:

service iptables restart

Verify that the rules are in place:

iptables -L
2015-04-28 00_30_27-104.245.38.202

An example of iptables -L

That’s it for the firewall configuration.


Time to create a separate user for the dedicated server. Call this user what ever you wish, but for the sake of this how-to, I will be using “Warband”:

useradd Warband
passwd Warband

Now let’s change to the home folder of the user we just created and make a directory for our server files:

su Warband
cd
mkdir Warband_Server
cd Warband_Server

Download the Warband dedicated server files to the Warband_Server directory we just created. The most recent dedicated server can be found HERE under the “Other Downloads” section.

2015-04-27 15_18_20-Mount&Blade Warband - TaleWorlds Entertainment

An example of what the “Other Downloads” looks like

We can “wget” the zipped file by right-clicking on the link and selecting “Copy Link Address” (For Chrome) or “Copy Shortcut” (For Internet Explorer):

2015-04-27 15_33_06-Mount&Blade Warband - TaleWorlds Entertainment

Getting the link to download so that we can wget it on the server.

2015-04-27 15_47_08-104.245.38.202

An example when you wget the download link

Now that we have the dedicated server files, we will need to unzip them:

unzip mb_warband_dedicated_1158.zip

Change into the Warband directory you just unzipped. You may need to use TAB to fill out the actual directory name:

cd Mount\&Blade\ Wardband\ Dedicated/

Inside you will find many sample server configuration templates to use. The easiest thing to do is edit one of the pre-existing templates. After deciding what kind of game mode you want to host, open it with nano:

nano Sample_Team_Deathmatch.txt

Review this file for applicable settings. The first changes you will want to make are:

#set_pass_admin ADMINPASS
#set_server_name SERVERNAME
#set_welcome_message WELCOME MESSAGE

Remove the “#” and add the appropriate changes to the admin password, server name, and welcome message. Also, keep in mind that the server name cannot have spaces or special characters in it. If you need to create a space, then use an underscore.

NOTE: You can find additional commands to add to this file from the readme.txt. For instance, I highly recommend adding the following line:

set_control_block_direction 1

If set to 1, blocking will have to be done manually by a mouse. Otherwise, directional blocking will be automatic… and that’s no fun.

One you are done, save your changes and exit from nano with CTRL O + Enter, and CTRL X.


Now let’s take a minute to discuss the TMUX package we installed earlier.

At this point, we are ready to run the dedicated server, but once we start it from the current terminal session, it will stop once we disconnect/exit from the session. This is where TMUX comes in. TMUX allows us to create a “Window” to run other applications in. This allows us to quit our current terminal session while leaving the window open to run whatever service we choose. For a better understanding of TMUX, see HERE.

Note: TMUX is what is referred to as a Terminal Multiplexer. The most popular alternative to TMUX is SCREEN. Both of which have very loyal user bases. It is a matter of preference on which one you decide to use.


Open a new window:

tmux

Now start the dedicated server with Wine. Make sure you are still in the dedicated server files directory when you run this:

wineconsole --backend=curses Sample_Team_Deathmatch_start.bat

Note: Each game mode template has an associated “.bat” file. Run the one that corresponds to the template you edited.

2015-04-27 23_28_28-104.245.38.202

An example of the wineconsole.exe

Once the dedicated server is finished loading, you can close the window with CTRL B + D.

Note: You can re-open any active TMUX sessions with the “tmux attach” command.


Now check to make sure that the server is still running with the “top” command:

2015-04-27 23_36_32-104.245.38.202

An example of top

Now go join your server!

Anet ServerList

An example of the Game server that was created.


How to Install WordPress on a Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Cloud Server

Brendan Bonner June 15, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
WordPress Illustration by Walker Cahall

WordPress Illustration by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 06/15/15

Introduction

This how-to will take you through installing WordPress on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. WordPress is a content management system which is free and open source. Since it is open source, there are a numerous amount of themes and plugins that are readily available to you. Although it is typically used as a blogging platform, it can be used for many other uses.

Prerequisites

To install WordPress, a Ubuntu 14.04 server running LAMP or LEMP is required. Please see our how-to guide for installing LAMP or LEMP. If you do not have a server, you can get a trusted cloud server from Atlantic.Net, or use our One-Click WordPress installation.

Installing WordPress on Ubuntu 14.04

Installing WordPress is very simple if you follow these steps. We will first start off by setting up the MySQL database.

Setting up the MySQL database in Ubuntu 14.04

We are going to start off by setting up the MySQL database by running the following commands:

mysql -u root -p

When prompted, enter your MySQL root password that you set up when installing MySQL.

In MySQL enter the following commands:

create database wordpress character set utf8 collate utf8_bin;

Make sure you set your secure password where it says [insert-password-here]

grant all privileges on wordpress.* to [email protected] identified by "[insert-password-here]";
flush privileges;
exit

Get the Latest WordPress Install on Ubuntu 14.04

Now that the database is created, we can download the latest version with the following command:

wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

The latest package will download to the directory that you are currently in, with the file name latest.tar.gz. We need to decompress the file by running:

tar -xzvf latest.tar.gz

Configure WordPress on Ubuntu 14.04

Next, we need to copy wp-config-sample.php to wp-config.php which is where it gets its base configuration. To do that, run:

cp wordpress/wp-config-sample.php wordpress/wp-config.php

In your favorite text editor, edit wordpress/wp-config.php

For a basic setup, we need to have the following.

define(‘DB_NAME’, ‘wordpress’);

define(‘DB_USER’, ‘wordpressuser’);

define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, ‘[insert-password-here]’);

It should look like this when completed:

What wp-config.php should look like once you have edited it

What wp-config.php should look like once you have edited it

 

Next, we need to move the WordPress folder to your web directory.

cp -r ~/wordpress/* /var/www/html

Note: Your web directory may be different based on your configuration.

Finish The Installation Through The WordPress Web Installation.

Now, we can go to the WordPress web installation. In your browser go to http://yourhostname-or-ipaddress

If you are unsure what your IP address is, run the following:

ifconfig
An example of using ifconfig to show the IP address of your server

An example of using ifconfig to show the IP address of your server

 

In our example, we would put http://172.20.6.154/ in the address bar and get the following page.

 

An example of the WordPress web installation

An example of the WordPress web installation

 

From here all that is needed to do is to follow along with the WordPress install and give the information required.

Congratulations! You have just installed WordPress on Ubuntu 14.04, check back for more updates. For more information, you may want to check out the WordPress Codex.


What is the HIPAA Security Rule?

The HIPAA Security Rule is a piece of the Healthcare insurance Portability and Accountability Act, passed by Congress and signed into law in 1996. Here is a little information on the Security Rule and a security checklist so that your organization can quickly and effectively become compliant.

  • HIPAA Security and Privacy Rules
  • HIPAA Security Checklist
  • Get Help

HIPAA Security and Privacy Rules

In 1996, a few pen strokes (and a lot of political wrangling leading up to those pen strokes) made a huge impact on the American healthcare industry: President Bill Clinton signed the Healthcare insurance Portability and Accountability Act into law.

Read More


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