Atlantic.Net Blog

How to Install WordPress using Atlantic.Net’s One-Click Install

Brendan Bonner June 26, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 06/15/15

Introduction

This how-to will show you how to install WordPress using Atlantic.Net’s One-click install. Currently, our WordPress application is installed on a LAMP stack using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Prerequisites

You need a valid Atlantic.Net cloud account. If you do not have an account, sign up for Cloud Hosting in less than 30 seconds.

Install WordPress using Atlantic.Net’s One-Click Install

First, we need to log into https://cloud.atlantic.net and select Add Server.

Click Add Server

Click Add Server

 

On the add a server page, the first step is to name your cloud server.

 

Type the name of what you want your server to be called.

Type the name of what you want your server to be called.

 

We now need to select the location for which you want your server housed at. All applications are available at every location.

 

Select the location you want your server to be at.

Select the location you want your server to be located.

 

Next select Applications to see all the one-click applications that are available.

 

Select Applications.

Select Applications.

 

Select the WordPress application.

 

Select WordPress.

Select WordPress.

 

Select the size of the server you would like.

 

Select your server size.

Select your server size.

 

Optionally you can add your SSH key and/or add backups.

 

Select your SSH key and add backups if you would like.

Select your SSH key and add backups if you would like.

 

Click Create Server, and you should see that your server is building.

 

An example of what you server looks like when building.

An example of what you server looks like when building.

 

Once it is built, you should get a screen similar to the one below. It has relevant information like the IP address of your server and login credentials. You will also get an email with the same information.

 

An example of what you server looks like after it is built.

An example of what you server looks like after it is built.

 

To get to the WordPress web installation, you need the verification link. The verification link is in the email sent to you, or on the Message of the Day screen when you first SSH into your server. The message of the Day also has your database passwords. Below is what the message of the day looks like when you login.

 

Note: The reason we use verification links rather than just going to the IP address, is the potential that someone could hijack your WordPress installation.

 

 

An example of what it looks like when you SSH into the server.

An example of what it looks like when you SSH into the server.

 

Copy the verification link and put it into your browser. You should get a screen similar to the one below where you can select your language of choice.

 

Select the language for your WordPress installation.

Select the language for your WordPress installation.

 

Now you can continue with the WordPress web installation to which will ask for your site title, username, password, and email, which is all customizable for what you would like.

 

An example of the WordPress web installation.

An example of the WordPress web installation.

Congratulations! You have just installed WordPress using Atlantic.Net’s one-click WordPress install, check back for more updates. For more information, you may want to check out the WordPress Codex.


How to Install FAMP (FreeBSD 10, Apache, MySQL, PHP) on a Cloud or VPS Server

Jose Velazquez June 25, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 06/15/15

Introduction

This how-to will help you with your FAMP installation in FreeBSD 10 so that you can successfully run a high available stable platform for your web environment. FAMP is simply a software bundle that consists of 4 components that work together to form a powerful web server.  However, in this setup the acronym’s are as follows: FreeBSD (F) is the core of the platform which will sustain the other components. Apache (A) is used for the web service. MySQL (M) is used for database management,  and PHP (P) is used as the programming language.

Prerequisites

You need a FreeBSD server that is configured with a static IP address. If you do not have a server already, you can visit our cloud hosting options page  and spin a new server up in under 30 seconds.

Install FAMP on FreeBSD 10

To get started, login to your FreeBSD server via SSH or through the VNC Console here. Atlantic.Net Cloud servers are setup as minimal installations to avoid having unnecessary packages from being installed and never used. If some software packages that you’re used to using aren’t installed by default, feel free to install them as needed. Let us download nano so we can simplify this tutorial.

pkg install nano

Let’s make sure that your server is fully up-to-date so we can complete the preparation.

freebsd-update fetch
freebsd-update install

 

With the server up-to-date, we can continue the process and install FAMP on your server.

Install Apache on FreeBSD 10

Begin by installing Apache with the following command:

pkg install apache24

Enable and start the Apache service with the following commands:

sysrc apache24_enable=yes
service apache24 start

To edit the main Apache configuration file for one or many websites according to your preference, they are configured in the following directory:

nano /usr/local/etc/apache24/httpd.conf

To verify and test the installation, create/edit the test HTML file in the following directory with the command below:

nano /usr/local/www/apache24/data/index.html

Insert/replace the following code in the HTML file then save and exit:

<html>
<title>CONGRATULATIONS</title>
<body>
<h2>You have just installed Apache on your FreeBSD Server</h2>
</body>
</html>

You can now verify that Apache is installed correctly by typing http:// and your IP address on your browser(http://YOUR.IP.ADD.RESS ) To get your servers IP Address enter the following command:

ifconfig vtnet0 | grep "inet " | awk '{ print $2 }'
This is the test page created to verify Apache was installed correctly in FreeBSD

This is the test page created to verify Apache was installed correctly in FreeBSD

Restart the Apache service so the changes can take effect on your system.

service apache24 restart

Install MySQL on FreeBSD 10

We then would like to continue by installing MySQL. After running the following MySQL, command hit enter to select y confirm your installation by tapping Enter.

pkg install mysql55-server

Enable and start the MySQL service with the following commands:

sysrc mysql_enable=yes
service mysql-server start

To ensure the security of the default settings of MySQL, continue with the command below:

mysql_secure_installation

Note: When prompt with “Enter current password for root” hit enter for none then Y(Yes) to set MYSQL password. You will then be prompted with a series of questions. Just type Y for yes on all of them, see the screen shot below:

This is the secure installation of screen when installing MySql on a FreeBSD FAMP Stack server

This is the secure installation of screen when installing MySql on a FreeBSD FAMP Stack server

Install PHP on FreeBSD 10

Finally, we will conclude with the FAMP Stack by installing PHP and configuring it to work with Apache.

pkg install mod_php56 php56-mysql php56-mysqli

With PHP installed, we can go ahead a begin the preparation to configure it with Apache. Copy the sample PHP configuration file to the correct location.

cp /usr/local/etc/php.ini-production /usr/local/etc/php.ini

Then run the following command to refresh the new changes to the system.

rehash

Update the Apache Configuration file with the following command:

nano /usr/local/etc/apache24/httpd.conf

Locate the DirectoryIndex line and add index.php in front of the existing index.html, so Apache reads the PHP files. The line should look like the following:

This is how the Apache file output after adding index.php to the configuration

This is how the Apache output should look after adding index.php to the DirectoryIndex line

(note: use the Ctrl+w in nano to search DirectoryIndex)

Add the following lines at the bottom of the configuration file so Apache can function PHP information accordingly.

<FilesMatch "\.php$">
    SetHandler application/x-httpd-php
</FilesMatch>
<FilesMatch "\.phps$">
    SetHandler application/x-httpd-php-source
</FilesMatch>

Fantastic! You can now save the file and restart Apache, so all your configuration take effect.

service apache24 restart

To verify and test the installation, create a test PHP file in the following directory with the command below:

nano /usr/local/www/apache24/data/info.php

Insert the following PHP code in the empty file then save and exit:

<?php phpinfo(); ?>

Restart the Apache HTTP service one last time so all the changes take effect.

service apache24 restart

You can now verify that PHP is installed correctly by typing the following on your browser.
http://YOUR.IP.ADD.RESS/info.php

This is the default page after installing PHP on an FAMP Stack FreeBSD server

This is the default page after installing PHP on an FAMP Stack FreeBSD server

What Next?

Congratulations! You now have a server with an FAMP Stack platform for your web environment. Thank you for following along and feel free to check back with us for further updates.


How to: Joining A Windows Server 2012 To A Domain

Ariel Beltre June 24, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 03/24/2015

Introduction

In this article, we will be going over the process of joining a Windows Server 2012 to an Active Directory Domain. Before you can complete, this process keep in mind that the server must first be able to communicate with the domain. This means that the server’s IP address configuration must reference the domains DNS server. Here we will demonstrate how to complete this process.

Prerequisites

– A Server with Windows Server 2012. If you do not have a server already, you can visit our Windows Cloud Hosting page and spin up a server in under 30 seconds.

Joining A Windows Server 2012 To A Domain

To join the server to a domain, move your mouse to the lower left corner of the screen and then right-click on the Start tile. Select the System Command from the Start tile’s menu. When the System dialog box appears, click the Change Settings link, shown below.

Screenshot of the "System" dialog box in Windows Server 2012

Screenshot of the “System” dialogue box in Windows Server 2012

The server should now display the System Properties sheet. Make sure that the Computer Name tab is selected, and then click the Change button. When Windows displays the Computer Name/Domain Changes dialog box shown below, enter your domain name and click OK. Windows will locate the domain and then prompt you for a set of administrative credentials. When the domain join completes, you will then be prompted to restart the server.

Screenshot of the "Computer name/Domain changes" window in Windows Server 2012

Screenshot of the “Computer name/Domain changes” window in Windows Server 2012

Conclusion

The process of joining a domain to a Windows Server 2012 is relatively straightforward. With just a few clicks, you can assign an active domain to your Windows server without issue.


How to Install and Use fail2ban in Ubuntu and Debian

Jason Mazzota June 23, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 02/17/2015

Introduction

Fail2ban is a great, wonderful service that is primarily used to stop brute-forcers from accessing your system. Fail2ban works great at deterring your basic attackers away by blocking them when it determines an attack may be happening. We will be performing steps below as the root user. You will need to sudo if you are using another user. For all editing of configuration files, we will be using vi; however, you can use any editor of your choice. This installation is performed on an Ubuntu 14.04 64bit Cloud server with IPTables installed per our IPTables guide. This guide is also applicable to our Ubuntu 12.04 OS and Debian.

Prerequisites

An Ubuntu 14.04 64bit server. If you do not have a server and would like one, consider SSD Cloud Hosting from Alantic.Net

Install and Use fail2ban in Ubuntu and Debian

Fail2ban is included in the default Ubuntu and Debian repository. All you need to do to install it is run:

apt-get install fail2ban

Once you have installed it, there are only a few changes we need to do to the configuration. The best practice when modifying configuration files like this, is always to copy out the original to a backup. In this case, you can leave the original alone as fail2ban does work with a duplicate .local file also named jail. To do this, simply run:

cp /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf /etc/fail2ban/jail.local

Once you’ve made that .local file, it’s time to edit it with your editor.

vi /etc/fail2ban/jail.local

Now as you’ll see when editing the file, there are A LOT of sections for you to “play” with and adjust. The main ones we’ll focus on are the ignoreip, bantime, findtime, maxretry, and specifically [ssh] sections.

anet-fail2ban-01

An example of what the /etc/fail2ban/jail.local file looks like

Note: In Ubuntu 12.04 and Debian, the configuration file looks a bit different from the above. You will only see ignoreip, bantime, and maxretry. The rest of the configuration as far as we are concerned here is the same.

In the picture above, at the green indicator at the top, you will find the ignoreip. The ignoreip is important as you can tell fail2ban to IGNORE your IP address. Setting ignoreip to the correct IP will prevent you from ever locking yourself out of your server by fail2ban. We highly recommend you add your IP address to this field. To add it, all you need to do is add a space after the 127.0.0.1/8 and put your IP.

Below the green indicator, you will find the bantime. As it states, this is how long a host is banned when triggered for banning. The bantime is the number of seconds that you want that IP address blocked from your system. We recommend that if you are gunning for someone to be blocked, you set this to a high number. The default is 10 minutes. Adding a 0 will make it 6000 seconds or 100 minutes (just over an hour and a half.) That’s a good start.

In Ubuntu 14.04, the next section is the findtime. As it states, this is the span of time fail2ban will look at for failed attempts. The default setting here of 10 minutes (600) is acceptable.

Under the findtime (or bantime in Ubuntu 12.04) you will find the maxretry. As it sounds, this is how many times you’ll be allowed to fail the log in within the findtime before the origin IP gets added to the ban for what you have set the bantime to be. 3 is a great number here to catch someone attempting to get in.

The last section we’ll look at is for [ssh]. You can see the section in the picture below. The biggest thing here to edit is the maxretry (each section can re-write your default maxretry to its own value) and the “port =” section. Maxretry in this means how many times a person can fail attempting SSH to your server before they are blocked. The lower this number, the better, but you also want to be safe to allow some retries, just in case.

In the “port =” section you’ll see the port is set to “ssh”. If you have not changed your SSH port, this is fine. If you have configured a custom SSH port like described in Changing your SSH Port In Ubuntu, you will want to change the port= section. For example, using our custom SSH port:

port = 922
anet-fail2ban-02

The location on where you can set the ssh port

Now once you have changed this configuration to your liking, all you need to do is save the changes you did and exit the file. Once out, just restart the fail2ban service to activate it.

service fail2ban restart

If you have installed IPTables like in our guide referenced at the beginning, then there is one more step you will need to take. You need to write your IPTables out to the IPTables rules.v4 file to save the changes that fail2ban has implemented. To do this you simply run a:

iptables-save > /etc/iptables/rules.v4

If you check your rules.v4 file, you will see that there is now a rule for fail2ban in place.  This is the rule fail2ban put in place when it was installed and is needed to stop anyone who is blocked by fail2ban.

In the future, when adding new services on the server (like FTP, email, etc) make sure you check your fail2ban configuration!


How to Install Nginx on a Arch Linux Cloud Server

Jose Velazquez June 22, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 06/22/15

Introduction

This tutorial shows you how to install Nginx on an Arch Linux Cloud Server. Nginx is known for its high performance and low memory usage which allow fewer resources to be used while getting the job done efficiently.

Prerequisites

You need an Arch Linux server that is configured with a static IP address. If you do not have a server already, why not consider one of our SSD Cloud Hosting solutions.

Server Preparation

To get started, let’s make sure that your server is fully up-to-date.

sudo pacman -Syu

With the server up-to-date, we can continue the process and install nginx on your server.

Install Nginx on Arch Linux

We begin by installing nginx with the following command:

sudo pacman -S nginx

Start the nginx service with the following command:

sudo systemctl start nginx.service

To edit the main Nginx configuration file for your website(s), open the nginx.conf file with your preferred text editor. This file is located in the following directory:

sudo nano /etc/nginx/nginx.conf

You can now verify that nginx is installed correctly by typing http:// and your IP address in your browser.

http://YOUR.IP.ADD.RESS

To get your servers IP Address type the following command:

curl -s icanhazip.com
This is the default page after Nginx has been installed in an Arch Linux server

This is the default page after Nginx has been installed in an Arch Linux server

What Next?

Congratulations! You have now installed and configured nginx. Thank you for following along, and feel free to check back with us for further updates.


How to Install Apache on Arch Linux

Jose Velazquez June 19, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 05/29/15

Introduction

This how-to will help you install and configure Apache on an Arch Linux server. Apache is a web server that is very popular in Linux systems and over the Internet. It is used by many web hosting companies worldwide because of its popularity and efficiency in hosting sites over the World Wide Web.

Prerequisites

You need an Arch Linux server that is configured with a static IP address. If you do not have a server already, Atlantic.Net offers a full line of SSD Cloud Hosting that will have you up and running in under 30 seconds.

Server Preparation

To get started, log in to your Arch Linux server. Let’s make sure that your server is fully up-to-date.

sudo pacman -Syu

With the server up-to-date, we can continue the process and install Apache on your Arch Linux server.

Install Apache on Arch Linux

We must first begin by installing Apache with the following command:

sudo pacman -S apache

Start the Apache service with the following command:

sudo systemctl start httpd

To edit the main Apache configuration file for one or many websites, according to your preference, open the configuration file located in the following directory:

sudo nano /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

In order to test the installation, create a test HTML file in the following directory with the command below:

sudo nano /srv/http/index.html

Insert the following HTML code in the empty file then save and exit:

<html>
<body>
<h1>CONGRATULATIONS</h1>
<h2>You have just installed Apache on your Arch Linux Server</h2>
</body>
</html>

You can now verify that Apache is installed correctly by typing http:// and your IP address in your browser.

http://YOUR.IP.ADD.RESS

To get your server’s public IP address, type the following command:

curl icanhazip.com
This is the test page created to verify the Apache install in Arch Linux.

This is the test page created to verify the Apache install in Arch Linux.

What Next?

Congratulations! You now have a server installed and configured with Apache. You may now continue building your website(s). Thank you for following along, and feel free to check back with us for further updates.


Cloud VPS vs. Traditional VPS vs. Private Cloud

Adnan Raja June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

VPS Changing with the Cloud

A critical concern when exploring hosting solutions is deciding whether you want to go with the innovative, newer option or to stick with the traditional model.  Public Cloud Server Hosting has grown astronomically in recent years. Perhaps 2014 was the year that cloud graduated from test projects and startups to enterprise acceptance, with General Electric announcing that it was already running 90% of new applications through the public cloud.

Read More


How to: Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP

Atlantic.Net NOC June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified 05-06-2015

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through getting started with your Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP cloud server and verify everything is installed correctly.

LAMP is a software bundle that consists of four components. Linux (L) is the core platform which the other components run on. Apache (A) is used to host web services. MySQL (M) is used for database management. PHP (P) is used for the back-end coding language.

Prerequisites

A server with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP. If you do not have a server already, you can visit spin up a dependable server in under 30 seconds.

Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 – LAMP

First, we will want to sign into our cloud control panel here

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LAMP

Cloud control panel login page

 

Once logged in, we will see our list of servers. To add an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LAMP already installed, we would click on “Add Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Adding a Server

 

You will be sent to a page to fill out the following:

-Server Name: Name the server whatever you’d like, it’s a cosmetic choice that does not impact server functionality. It’s there to help you manage your servers.

-Location: Select which Atlantic.Net Cloud Platform you want your server hosted on. For best overall best performance, select the location closes to you.

1) In this tutorial, we chose USA-East-1.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your Server location

 

-Operating System you would want to choose which will be “Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Server 64-bit – LAMP”

1) You would first click on “Applications”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your OS Type

 

2) Then click on “LAMP”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LAMP

Choosing your OS type

 

-Plan size of your choice. This will depend on what you will be using the server for. You are able to scale up the server at anytime but unable to scale down. You are able to view more detail for each plan on our cloud server pricing page.

1) In this tutorial, we clicked on the “Small” plan size

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your Plan size

 

-If you would like to enable backups for your server then you would check the box beside “Enable Backups”. Daily backups cost 20% of your server’s monthly price (minimum $1). Once enabled, you are able to restore your server to a previous date through the cloud control panel. You are able to enable/disable backups at any time as well.

After you have completed filling everything out, click on “Create Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LAMP

Creating the server

 

You will then be sent to a page with the server details including the server credentials. You are also emailed the server credentials.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LAMP

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – LAMP Server Details

 

Once your server is provisioned, you will need to SSH into your server. You can navigate to here if you are not sure how to SSH into your server.

Once you have logged into your server, you will see the provided LAMP Notes.

Note: Make note of your current “root database password” as we will need it later to change it to a user-defined password for security reasons.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

LAMP Notes

 

You will want to verify everything was installed correctly and are working. To check Apache, go to http://<serveripaddress> , if it is installed, then you will see this.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

Apache Default Page

 

To verify MySQL is installed and working, run the following command

service mysql status

You will see this result if it is running

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

MySQL status

 

To make your MySQL more secure and to change the database root password from the provided one, run the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

You will first be prompted to enter the current root password for MySQL which was provided in the LAMP Notes when you first logged into your server.

Once you have entered the correct password, you will be asked if you want to change the root password, you would type “y” and then enter if you would like to change it. After changing your password, you will be prompted to answer a couple more questions which will make your MySQL secure by removing anonymous users, disallowing root login remotely, removing the test database and access to it (Ignore error as database does not exist) and then reloading the privilege tables. Once done, you are complete with MySQL!

Verifying PHP

To verify PHP is installed and working properly, we will create a basic PHP script. In this article, we will save it under the web root directory as test.php. In Ubuntu 14.04, the web root directory is located at /var/www/html. We will create the file at that location by running the following command:

nano /var/www/html/test.php

This will open an empty file, we want to input the following text.

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Save and close the file.

We will now test if the server can generate the PHP script. You will want to go to your browser and enter the following URL:

http://<serveripaddress>/test.php

If your server is able to translate the PHP script correctly, you will see something similar to the below picture.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04-LAMP

PHP Information page

 

Once you have verified all components of the LAMP installation, you are able to begin configurations for your site!

Come back and check for updates!


How to Install LAMP (Apache, MariaDB, PHP) on a CentOS 7.2 Cloud Server

Brendan Bonner June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
LAMP Magic In Your Hands created by Walker Cahall

LAMP Magic In Your Hands created by Walker Cahall

Verified and Tested 12/31/15

Introduction

This how-to will show you a basic installation of LAMP on a CentOS 7.2 Cloud Server. LAMP, on CentOS 7.2, is a software bundle consisting of four components: Linux, Apache, MariaDB, and PHP. LAMP is the backbone for a wide variety of web-based software, such as WordPress and other web-hosting platforms. We will be using CentOS 7.2 for our Linux installation in this how-to. CentOS 7.2 implements systemd which will make this guide very different than the CentOS LAMP articles you may have seen in the past. Additionally the default database engine used by CentOS 7 is MariaDB and not MySQL. MariaDB is a forked version of MySQL, so most of the functionality that you may know from MySQL is built into MariaDB. We will be using Apache for our web server and PHP for our scripting language.

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How to: Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP

Atlantic.Net NOC June 18, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified 05-06-2015

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through getting started with your Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP cloud server and verify everything is installed correctly.

LEMP is a software bundle that consists of four components. Linux (L) is the core platform which the other components run on. Nginx (E) is used to host web services. MySQL (M) is used for database management. PHP (P) is used for the back-end coding language.

Prerequisites

A server with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP. If you do not have a server already, you can spin up a reliable and trusted server from Atlantic.Net.

Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 – LEMP

First, we will want to sign into our cloud control panel here

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Cloud control panel login page

 

Once logged in, we will see our list of servers. To add an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with LEMP already installed, we would click on “Add Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Adding a Server

 

You will be sent to a page to fill out the following:

-Server Name: Name the server whatever you’d like, it’s a cosmetic choice that does not impact server functionality. It’s there to help you manage your servers.

-Location: Select which Atlantic.Net Cloud Platform you want your server hosted on. For best overall best performance, select the location closes to you.

1) In this tutorial, we chose USA-East-1.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Choosing your Server location

 

-Operating System you would want to choose which for this article will be “Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Server 64-bit – LEMP”

1) You would first click on “Applications”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your OS Type

 

2) Then click on “LEMP”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your OS Type

 

-Plan size of your choice. This will depend on what you will be using the server for. You are able to scale up the server at anytime but unable to scale down. You are able to view more detail for each plan here on our cloud server pricing page.

1) In this tutorial, we clicked on the “Small” plan size

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Choosing your Plan size

 

-If you would like to enable backups for your server then you would check the box beside “Enable Backups”. Daily backups cost 20% of your server’s monthly price (minimum $1). Once enabled, you are able to restore your server to a previous date through the cloud control panel. You are able to enable/disable backups at any time as well.

After you have completed filling everything out, click on “Create Server”

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 - LEMP

Creating the server

 

You will then be sent to a page with the server details including the server credentials. You are also emailed the server credentials.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Newly provisioned Server details

 

Once your server is provisioned, you will need to SSH into your server. You can navigate to here if you are not sure how to SSH into your server.

Once you have logged into your server, you will see the provided LEMP Notes to help us verify everything.

NOTE: Make note of your current “root database password” as we will need it later to change it to a user-defined password for security reasons.

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

LEMP Notes

 

You will want to verify everything was installed correctly and is working. To check Nginx, go to http://<serveripaddress> , if it is installed, then you will see this default Nginx page.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

Nginx Default Page

 

Verifying MySQL

To verify MySQL is installed and working, run the following command

service mysql status

You will see this result if it is running

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

MySQL Status

To make your MySQL more secure and to change the database root password from the provided one, run the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

You will first be prompted to enter the current root password for MySQL which was provided in the LEMP Notes when you first logged into your server.

Once you have entered the correct password, you will be asked if you want to change the root password, you would type “y” and then enter if you would like to change it. After changing your password, you will be prompted to answer a couple more questions which will make your MySQL secure by removing anonymous users, disallowing root login remotely, removing the test database and access to it (Ignore error as database does not exist) and then reloading the privilege tables. Once done, you are complete with MySQL!

Verifying PHP

To verify PHP is installed and working properly, we will create a basic PHP script. In this article, we will save it under the web root directory as test.php. In Ubuntu 14.04, the web root directory is located at /usr/share/nginx/html. We will create the file at that location by running the following command:

nano /usr/share/nginx/html/test.php

This will open an empty file, we want to input the following text.

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Save and close the file.

We will now test if the server can generate the PHP script. You will want to go to your browser and enter the following URL:

http://<serveripaddress>/test.php

If your server is able to translate the PHP script correctly, you will see something similar to the below picture.

 

anet-Getting Started with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS - LEMP

PHP Information page

Once you have verified all components of the LEMP installation, you are able to begin configurations for your site!

Come back and check for updates, and spin up a reliable Cloud Server from Atlantic.Net.


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