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Format Guide for Atlantic.Net How-To Articles

Atlantic.Net NOC June 1, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments

Introduction

If you think you’d like to write for Atlantic.Net, you should start by completing our signup form.

How-to articles for Atlantic.Net should conform to the standards indicated in the sections below:

Sections (including Introduction, Prerequisites, and the Tutorial itself)
Format (Markdown or simple HTML)
Images/Screenshots
Original Work

Please also review our style guide for additional guidance.

Sections

Each How-To article should begin with the Introduction section, which briefly describes the scope of the article. The word “Introduction” should be contained within H3 headers.

Following Introduction should be Prerequisites, indicated with H3 headers. Prerequisites should include which operating system the article is relevant to, including appropriate distribution (e.g., “Ubuntu 14.04 and earlier” or “Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2”).

You should also include packages, roles, or features that will be required and whose installation and configuration will not be covered by this article. Check to ensure that an article covering that installation/configuration exists and include a link.

Example: (excerpted from Install WordPress on a Fedora 22 Cloud Server .)

Prerequisite

– A Fedora 22 server running LAMP or LEMP is required. Please see our how-tos for Fedora 22 LAMP or LEMP.

 

The bulk of the article, the tutorial, follows the Prerequisites section.

Format

How-To articles for Atlantic.Net can be submitted in Markdown or simple HTML.

Supported text formatting: header text, code blocks, inline code (for commands and keystrokes), italics (for variables), and bold (for emphasis).

 

Headers

H2 should be used for major sections of the tutorial.

H3 should be used for “Introduction”, “Prerequisites”, and subsections of the tutorial.

 

Code Blocks

Any code that needs to be entered as part of the tutorial should be included in a code block.

 

If referencing code inline, you may use the code tag. This use should be confined to referring back to a portion of code already included in a nearby code block. In most cases, inline code will be used in explanations of variables or options that commands may take.

Example:

Be careful when using the -r option with rm. It recursively attempts to delete all files subordinate to the path you indicate.

 

Variable/custom information format

Placeholders for variables or custom configuration entries (such as hostnames) should be italicized. Our parser will also tint all italicized entries green.

 

Emphasis

If you’d like to indicate emphasis, use bold.

 

Keystrokes

When it comes to referencing keystrokes inline with the text, enclose them in a code span.

Example:

Press the Enter key.

For keystrokes requiring multiple keys to be pressed simultaneously, use a plus sign (+) between keys.

Example:

To exit, press Ctrl+C.

To switch users, first press Ctrl+Alt+Del.

 

.

Images

How-to’s should include appropriate screenshots, showing such visual element as where to click or what a screen should look like (such as a phpinfo page, for instance). Images should have a maximum width of 730 pixels.

Include a link to the image using the URL where it is currently hosted. Articles accepted for publication will have all associated images downloaded and hosted on our servers. Along with images, we require the following:

Image Name: format anet-articlename-## (where the ## is replaced by a number, e.g., anet-how_to_install_lamp_debian_8-01).
Alt Text: brief description of the image, in case it does not load.
Caption: brief description appearing beneath the image.

Any uniquely identifiable information should be obscured, preferably through the use of obvious placeholder names (such as “example.com” or “192.168.0.2”).

Original Work

All articles written for Atlantic.Net must be original works. Atlantic.Net will not tolerate plagiarism nor the re-use of previously existing work. If you’ve already written a particular tutorial elsewhere and would like to do something similar with us, then take this opportunity to improve upon your original effort!

Similarly, all images and screenshots should also be unique.


Is RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol) HIPAA Compliant?

  • Remote Desktop Protocol and HIPAA Compliance
  • Client Needs System for Nationwide Remote Desktop
  • Perspective of Complete Healthcare Solutions
  • Security Increasingly Critical in Healthcare

RDP and HIPAA Compliance

Remote desktop protocol (RDP) can be made HIPAA compliant with the help of a HIPAA-compliant hosting company. Healthcare security and HIPAA compliance are points of focus for us at Atlantic.Net. Here is a sample chat we had with a prospective client interested in setting up nationwide access to a compliant system via remote desktop protocol (RDP).

Read More


A Story About a HIPPAA-Compliant Website & Mobile App

Dell strategist Jim Stikeleather has argued that big data projects should tell a story. He said that by thinking in a similar manner to journalists, data scientists can more deliberately and captivatingly frame and communicate the information and filters they want to explore.

Storytelling can assist with understanding of any situation, particularly technology – which often can seem obtuse, boring, and inhuman. Obviously, people breathe life into technological situations – as when stories are told of people problem-solving using the tools of the technological era.

Read More


How to Install Apache, MariaDB, PHP (LAMP) on Fedora 22

Ernest Coleman May 26, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 05/26/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through the LAMP install on your Fedora 22 Server. With the many changes of Fedora 22, a typical LAMP install is different than you may have seen in the past.   Fedora 22 still uses Apache and MariaDB, PHP, although they are using slightly updated versions of each.

Prerequisites

A  server with Fedora 22 installed. If you do not have a server, and you would like one, fire up a Fedora 22 server from Atlantic.Net.

Install Lamp on Fedora 22

To start, we need to make sure the system is updated. To do that run the command:

dnf update

We are now able to start the installation for Apache.

Install Apache on Fedora 22

Install Apache with the following command:

dnf install httpd

Now that apache is installed, we need to start Apache with the following command:

systemctl start httpd.service

You will want the Apache service to start on start-up/reboot with the following command:

systemctl enable httpd.service

Add the following commands in Apache to override in Firewall-cmd as follows:

firewall-cmd --set-default-zone=public
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=http
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=https
firewall-cmd --reload

You can now verify that Apache is installed correctly by typing http:// and your IP or hostname on your browser.

Note: If you do not know your IP address, run the following command:

ip addr show eth0
An example of ip addr showing the IP of 192.168.100.10

An example of ip addr showing the IP of 192.168.100.10

In our example we would put http://192.168.100.10 into our browser’s address bar.

 

The default Apache page for Fedora 22

The default Apache page for Fedora 22

 

Installing MariaDB on Fedora 22

Install MySQL with the following command for to begin the install:

dnf install mariadb-server

Start the service with the following command

systemctl start mariadb

To have MariaDB start on boot, run the following command:

systemctl enable mariadb

You can then check the status of MariaDB to ensure it is running by using the command:

systemctl status mariadb

Set the MariaDB root password and secure MariaDB with the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

First, you will be prompted for the MariaDB root password. Since we just installed MariaDB and did not set a root password, you would just leave it blank and press Enter. You will then be asked if you would like to set the root password. Enter ‘Y’ for yes and then create a password of your choice.

Note: Afterwards, you will be prompted with a series of questions. Just type Y for yes on all of them, see the screen shot below:

An example of the mysql_secure_installation for MariaDB on Fedora 22

An example of the mysql_secure_installation for MariaDB on Fedora 22

Install PHP on Fedora 22

Finally, we will conclude the installing PHP with the following command:

dnf install php php-mysql

Restart the Apache HTTP service, so the changes take effect.

systemctl restart httpd.service

To test and verify this installation create a test PHP file in the directory below with the following command:

sudo nano /var/www/html/info.php

Insert the following PHP code in the empty space then save and exit:

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Restart the Apache HTTP service one last time so all the changes take effect.

sudo systemctl enable httpd.service

You can now verify that PHP is installed correctly by typing the following on your browser.
http://ip.ad.dre.ss/info.php

An example of the info.php web page on fedora 22

An example of the info.php web page on fedora 22

What Next?

Congratulations! You now have a server with a LAMP platform for your web environment. Thank you for following along and feel free to check back with us for further updates, or check out our guide on installing WordPress.


Install WordPress on a Fedora 22 Cloud Server

Brendan Bonner May 26, 2015 by under Managed Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 05/25/15

Introduction

This how-to will show you how to install WordPress on Fedora 22. WordPress started as a blogging system, but now has become a full content management system (CMS). It is a free, open source program, which has become the most popular CMS on the Web. With thousands of plugins, your website is nearly limitless.

Prerequisite

– A Fedora 22 server running LAMP or LEMP is required. Please see our how-tos for Fedora 22 LAMP or LEMP.

Creating The WordPress Database In MariaDB on Fedora 22

We are going to start off by setting up the database  in MariaDB, by running the following commands:

mysql -u root -p

When prompted, enter your MariaDB root password that you set up when installing MariaDB.

In MariaDB, enter the following commands: (Make sure you set your secure password where it says [insert-password-here])

create database wordpress character set utf8 collate utf8_bin;
grant all privileges on wordpress.* to [email protected] identified by '[insert-password-here]';
flush privileges;
exit

The commands above creates a database called wordpress, a dbuser named wordpressuser with a password [insert-password-here]. You can modify these settings to your liking.

Downloading And Unpacking The Latest WordPress Install on Fedora 22

Since we created the database, we can now move on to the next step of downloading the latest WordPress install by running the following command:

wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

Note: if Wget is not installed, install it by running the command:

dnf install wget

Wget will download the compressed WordPress install, in the directory that you are currently in. We now need to unpack it by running the command:

tar -xzvf latest.tar.gz

Configuring the WordPress Install on Fedora 22

wp-config.php is where WordPress gets its base configuration. We need to make a wp-config.php by copying wp-config-sample.php and making a new file. To do that run:

cp wordpress/wp-config-sample.php wordpress/wp-config.php

Next we need to edit wordpress/wp-config.php. In this how-to we will be using the text editor nano.

nano wordpress/wp-config.php

For a simple setup, we need to edit the following values:

define(‘DB_NAME’, ‘wordpress’);

define(‘DB_USER’, ‘wordpressuser’);

define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, ‘[insert-password-here]’);

It should look like this when completed:

An image showing the styling for the WordPress db info

Please be careful when updating this file.

 

We now need to move the config files to the web directory.

For LAMP run the command:

sudo cp -r ~/wordpress/* /var/www/html

For LEMP run the command:

sudo cp -r ~/wordpress/* /usr/share/nginx/html

Finishing The WordPress Install In The Web Installation on Fedora 22

We now can go to the web installation by going to http://yourhostname-or-ipaddress in your browser.

If you are unsure what you IP address is run the following:

ifconfig
An example of ifconfig showing the IP address 192.169.0.15

An example of ifconfig showing the IP address 192.169.0.15

In the above example, we would put http://192.68.0.15/ in the browser address bar and get the following page.

 

An example of the WordPress web installation

An example of the WordPress web installation

 

The next step is to follow the web installation by submitting your information. Congratulations you have installed WordPress on Fedora 22, please check back for more updates. For more information, you may want to check out the WordPress Codex.

Atlantic.Net

Atlantic.net offers managed hosting services which include a layer of business-essential managed services to your hosting packages. Contact us today for more information.


How to Install Apache on Fedora 22

Jose Velazquez May 26, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 05/26/15

Introduction

This how-to will help you with your install and configuration of Apache on your Fedora 22 server. Apache is a web server that is very popular in Linux systems and over the Internet. It is used by many Web Hosting companies worldwide because of its popularity and efficiency in hosting sites over the World Wide Web.

Prerequisites

You need a Fedora 22 server that is configured with a static IP address. If you do not have a server already, you can visit our Cloud Hosting page and spin a new server up in under 30 seconds.

Install Apache

To get started, log into your Fedora 22 via SSH or the VNC Console in cloud.atlantic.net. Atlantic.Net Cloud servers are setup as minimal installations in order to avoid having unnecessary packages from being installed and never used.  Because of this, let’s make sure that your server is fully up-to-date.

dnf update

With the server up-to-date, we can continue the installation process on your Fedora 22 server.

Install Apache with the following command:

dnf install httpd

Start Apache with the following command:

systemctl start httpd.service

You will want the Apache service to start on start-up/reboot with the following command:

systemctl enable httpd.service

Additionally you must add the following commands in your Firewall-cmd to allow Apache through:

firewall-cmd --set-default-zone=public
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=http
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=https
firewall-cmd --reload

Verify if all is working by typing http://YOUR.IP.ADD.RESS

Your IP could be retrieved from the server with following command:

ifconfig
This is the default page after installing Apache in Fedora 22

This is the default page after installing Apache in Fedora 22

What Next?

With that, you now have a server installed and configured with Apache. You may now continue building your website. Thank you for following along and feel free to check back with us for further updates.


How to Install Linux, Nginx, MariaDB And PHP (LEMP) On Fedora 22

Atlantic.Net NOC May 26, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
verified and Tested 05/20/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through the LEMP install on your Fedora 22 Server.

LEMP is simply a software bundle that consists of 4 components. L (Linux) the core of the platform which will sustain the other components.E(Nginx)will be used for the web service. M(MariaDB)will be used for database management, and P(PHP) will be as the programming language. Making the platform a LEMP.

Prerequisites

A cloud server with Fedora 22 already installed (which will take care of the L(Linux) aspect of the LEMP install).  If you do not have a server, why not spin up a Fedora 22 server from Atlantic.Net in under 30 seconds.

Installing NGINX in Fedora 22

Install NGINX with the following command:

dnf install nginx

Start the NGINX service with the following command:

systemctl start nginx

Configure NGINX to start when the system is rebooted:

systemctl enable nginx

You will also need to add the following firewall rules to let HTTP and HTTPS ports through the local firewall. Run the following commands to add them to the firewall:

firewall-cmd --set-default-zone=public
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=http
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=https
firewall-cmd --reload

You can then check the status of nginx by running:

systemctl status nginx

You will now have NGINX installed on your server and can be verified typing in the following with your IP ADDRESS on your browser. Also, all configuration files are provided in the page.

If you do not know your IP address, you can use the following command to grab it:

ifconfig

You should get an output similar to this:

anet-install-lemp-fedora22-01

Using ifconfig to show ip address

In this server, our ip address shows 10.10.250.58 so we would put in our browser, http://10.10.250.58 and get the following page:

anet-install-lemp-fedora22-02

Nginx default page

Installing MariaDB on Fedora 22

Install MySQL with the following command for to begin the install:

dnf install mariadb-server

Start the service with the following command

systemctl start mariadb

To have MariaDB start on boot, run the following command:

systemctl enable mariadb

You can then check the status of MariaDB to ensure it is running by using the command:

systemctl status mariadb

Set the MariaDB root password and secure MariaDB with the following command:

mysql_secure_installation

First, you will be prompted for the MariaDB root password. Since we just installed MariaDB and did not set a root password, you would just leave it blank and press Enter. You will then be asked if you would like to set the root password. Enter ‘Y’ for yes and then create a password of your choice.

Note: Afterwards, you will be prompted with a series of questions. Simply type Y for yes on all of them, see the screen shot below:

anet-install-lemp-fedora22-03

Series of questions to secure MariaDB

Installing PHP on Fedora 22

Install PHP with the following command for to begin the install:

dnf install php php-mysql php-fpm

 

We will want to make a security configuration change in php.ini. Open php.ini with your text editor:

nano /etc/php.ini

You will need to search for the following line, ;cgi.fix_pathinfo=1. Once there, delete the semi-colon and change the value from ‘1’ to ‘0’.

anet-install-lemp-fedora22-05

PHP.ini configuration file

This change will make sure you are not victim to a well-known exploit in the Nginx environment. This changes how PHP files are interpreted.

 

Start php-fpm with the following command:

systemctl start php-fpm

To make sure it starts on boot, run the following:

anet-install-lemp-fedora22-04

PHP.ini configuration file

systemctl enable php-fpm

To check the status and make sure php-fpm is running:

systemctl status php-fpm

With all the configuration changes, we will need to restart Nginx as well before testing PHP.

systemctl restart nginx

Now we are ready to test everything. We will create a simple PHP script to test it all. The path to add the php script is located in the same place as the index.html we saw when installing Nginx. The path is /usr/share/nginx/html/ . We will open a new file under this path called test.php by running the following command.

nano /usr/share/nginx/html/test.php

Insert the following code in the empty space:

<?php
phpinfo();
?>

Save and exit.

In your browser, navigate to http://ip.ad.dre.ss/test.php and you will see information for your PHP installation.

anet-install-lemp-fedora22-05

PHP information page

Since you have tested PHP to be working, you will want to remove the test.php from your server as it is showing your PHP information publicly.

rm /usr/share/nginx/html/test.php

You are also able to view this detailed information of your PHP installation by running “php -i”.

Congratulations! You have just installed LEMP on your Fedora 22 Server. Check back with us for any new updates!


How to Install Nginx on Fedora 22

Atlantic.Net NOC May 26, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 05/20/15

Introduction

In this How-To, we will walk you through the Nginx install on your Fedora 22 Server. Nginx is a HTTP and reverse proxy server and mail proxy server. It is used on many prominent sites such as Netflix and WordPress.

Prerequisites

A cloud server with Fedora 22 already installed. If you do not have a server already, you can spin up a cloud server in under 30 seconds.

Installing NGINX in Fedora 22

To get started, log into your Fedora 22 via SSH or the VNC Console in cloud.atlantic.net. Atlantic.Net Cloud servers are setup as minimal installations in order to avoid having unnecessary packages from being installed and never used.  Because of this, let’s make sure that your server is fully up-to-date.

dnf update

With the server up-to-date, we can continue the installation process on your Fedora 22 server.

Install NGINX with the following command:

dnf install nginx

Start the the service with the following command:

systemctl start nginx

Configure NGINX to start when the system is rebooted:

systemctl enable nginx

You will also need to add the following firewall rules to let HTTP and HTTPS ports through the local firewall. Run the following commands to add them to the firewall:

firewall-cmd --set-default-zone=public
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=http
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=https
firewall-cmd --reload

You can then check the status by running:

systemctl status nginx

You will now have NGINX installed on your server and can be verified typing in the following with your IP ADDRESS on your browser. Also, all configuration files are provided in the page.

Your IP could be retrieved from the server with following command:

ifconfig

http://ip.ad.dre.ss

anet-Installing Nginx on Fedora 22

The default page

You can now insert your site in the /usr/share/nginx/html directory. This is the default web directory.

You have now completed installing Nginx on your Fedora 22 server. Come back and check for updates!


What Is the Logjam Vulnerability?

Mason Moody May 22, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
The Logjam Vulnerability

Photo: Sharon Mollerus / licensed under CC BY 2.0

Overview of Logjam

On May 20, 2015, a team of researchers announced a new vulnerability in the protocol that allows web servers to establish secure (HTTPS) connections to web browsers. Calling this exploit the Logjam Attack, the team, made up of computer scientists and security specialists from multiple universities and technology companies, demonstrated how it is possible for a man-in-the-middle attacker to downgrade a vulnerable TLS connection to use an encryption cipher which is “relatively easily” broken. This attack is the latest in a series of cipher downgrade attacks, such as FREAK and POODLE, that target implementations of the HTTPS protocol.

SSL/TLS Overview

To understand how this attack works, it might be helpful to review how TLS (Transport Layer Security, though this protocol is often still referenced by its predecessor’s initialism, SSL, Secure Sockets Layer) protects an HTTPS connection. When a web browser requests a webpage via an HTTPS connection, the host server will first offer its certificate to authenticate its identity, which uses the asymmetric cryptography within the public key infrastructure. Once authenticated, the server then enters into a negotiation with the client browser over which cipher suite they will use for the connection. In most cases, they will use the strongest cipher suite they are able to agree upon. When they determine the encryption algorithm, they then negotiate their shared secret key via a process called the Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange.

Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange

The Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange allows for the secure generation of a new shared key between parties to happen over an insecure medium. The larger the bit-length of the Diffie-Hellman group, the more resilient it is to being cracked by a brute force attack. Groups of 1024 bits are in wide use, though the researchers who discovered the Logjam vulnerability posit that it is within the reach of state-sponsored actors to crack encryption of this strength. The Logjam vulnerability is exploited by forcing the two parties to downgrade the Diffie-Hellman group to a 512-bit group, which can be cracked in minutes.

How Concerned Should We Be?

Exploiting the Logjam vulnerability requires an attacker to be able to occupy a man-in-the-middle position. In other words, an attacker would need to be able to access the same network as the client, server, or any ISP in between. This access, which includes most wired connections, is generally walled off from most garden-variety snoopers. If you access the Internet via an open public wi-fi access point, then you might have cause for concern, whether from an exploit of this vulnerability or a host of others. In that case, your best bet is to utilize a VPN (if you are concerned about security, then this a prudent strategy in any case).

If an attacker is able to pull off this exploit, it’s only the first step. It still requires that attacker to have access to a device with significant computational power to successfully decrypt any intercepted and downgraded encrypted traffic. As such, it’s not the simplest trick to execute, so it’s probably not a vulnerability that one should lose too much sleep over. However, a vulnerability is a vulnerability, so the sooner patched, the sooner you can knock it off the list of things to worry about.

What To Do To Protect Yourself

As of the release of the news of this discovery, only the latest version of Internet Explorer has been patched for this exploit (it should be noted that one of the researchers on this team works for Microsoft Research). Mozilla, Google, and Apple have announced that they are working on patches for their respective browsers, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. When those patches are released, you should update your browser to those versions to enable protection from this vulnerability. In the meantime, though, if you are concerned about your exposure to this sort of attack, you might want to stick to IE for your secure browsing.

If you administer a web or email server, you can mitigate your vulnerability by removing from your cloud server the list of cipher suites export suites (old, intentionally weakened ciphers that were once the only encryption technology allowed to be exported outside the United States). The group who discovered this exploit also recommend the usage of Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman, Ephemeral (ECDHE) as preferred ciphers for their resilience to all known cryptographic attacks. See their site where you can test your server and get guidance on how to make these configuration changes.

Atlantic.Net’s world class cloud hosting solutions and technical staff work around the clock making sure that our customers data is secure and private.   Please feel free to contact our staff and check our community and blog pages for any further updates.


How to Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012

Jose Velazquez May 22, 2015 by under Cloud Hosting 0 Comments
Verified and Tested 03/31/2015

Introduction

In this how-to will walk you through Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012

Active Directory Certificate Services or ADCS is a feature that provides certificates for user authentication. The purpose of this feature is increase the security of the network by using the certificate that holds the users information and Private keys assigned.

Prerequisites

– A Server with Windows Server 2012. If you need a server, you can get a affordable Windows Server from Atlantic.Net.

Install Active Directory Certificate Services

Open the Server Manager from the task bar.

From Server Manager Dashboard, select Add roles and features. This will launch the Roles and Features Wizard allowing for modifications to be performed on the Windows Server 2012 instance.

Add roles and features

Click “Add roles and features”

 

Note: If its the first time that you have entered this wizard, you will get a Before you Begin page. Review it and you can check the Skip this page by default box,  then click Next

 

Select Role-based or features-based installation from the Installation Type screen and click Next.

Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012-2

Select “Role-based or features-based installation”

 

You will now have Select destination server page. Your server will be selected by default, so you can simply click Next to continue.

Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012-3

Select the server you would like to install on.

 

Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012-1

Select “Active Directory Certificate Services”

The Select Server Roles page appears. Select the Active Directory Certificate Services check box, and then click Next.

Click Next in the Features Screen/ click Next in the Active Directory Certificate Services Screen/ Select any additional Role in the Role Services(I selected all of them just in case I need them later down the road) and click next.
Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012-2

Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012-3

Click Install

Confirm your Installation and click Install.

Install Active Directory Certificate Services Windows Server 2012-4

Active Directory Certificate Services is installed on the left side of the server manager.

You can now see that the Active Directory Certificate Services role is currently installed in your Server Manager Screen.

Congratulations! You have just Installed Active Directory Certificate Services in Windows Server 2012. Thank you for following along in this How-To and feel free to check back with us for any new updates.


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